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Tag: Asheville Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Asheville Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Organizations across South step up to keep plant off endangered species list

    May 16, 2014 | 4 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — The Georgia aster is an uncommon Southern plant that has been in decline for decades and on the verge of federal protection. However, today, numerous organizations, private and public, are stepping up to conserve the plant in an effort that should keep it off the endangered species list. The move comes as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with states and other federal agencies, advance a large, partnership-based effort to conserve at-risk plants and animals across the Southeast.  Learn more...

News

  • A grass like plant with a large geometric shaped bulb.
    Golden sedge (Carex lutea) growing next to a pond cypress tree in Pender County, NC. Photo by Dale Suiter, USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 33 southeastern species

    May 19, 2014 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 25 endangered and eight threatened species occurring in one or more of the 10 states in the Southeast and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide written information and comments concerning these species on or before May 27, 2014. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) are accurate.  Read the full story...

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Partners to sign agreement to conserve rare plant

    May 14, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Georgia aster is an uncommon Southern plant that declined for decades, to the verge of receiving federal protection. However, nine organizations, private and public, are committing to conserve the plant in an effort that should keep it off the endangered species list. The commitment will be memorialized this Friday in an agreement called a Candidate Conservation Agreement, designed to proactively conserve plants and animals before they need Federal protection.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Several dozen visitors surround a fast moving stream looking for trout.
    Information icon The fishing rodeo drew a large crowd. Photo by Andrew Currie, USFWS.

    Kids Fishing Day

    May 26, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. My daughter and I walked past the racks of fishing rods for loan, found a quiet spot on the bank of Lake Powhatan, a Forest Service lake on the edge of Asheville, and settled in for a morning of fishing. We didn’t catch anything, but we still enjoyed the stillness of the spot, and the opportunity to simply observe the natural world around us, from the dragonflies to the turtle that swam by.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of floating yellow lights in the forest
    Fireflies. Photo by N G, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Synchronous firefly viewing

    May 19, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This year, firefly viewing at the Elkmont Campground area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park will be from June 4 through June 11. Every year in late May or early June, thousands of visitors gather near the popular Elkmont Campground to observe the naturally occurring phenomenon of Photinus carolinus; a firefly species that flashes synchronously. Access to the viewing area is provided by shuttle from the Sugarlands Visitor Center.  Learn more...

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Georgia aster

    May 12, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Georgia aster is an uncommon plant that declined for decades, to the verge of receiving federal protection. However, this spring, numerous organizations, private and public, are stepping up to conserve the plant in an effort that should keep it off the endangered species list. The plant is found in the upper Piedmont and lower mountain regions of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.  Learn more...

  • A colorful yellow and red trout covered in small black spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a rainbow trout. Photo by Mark Lisac, USFWS.

    Trout season opens

    March 31, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings, and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission will open approximately 1,000 miles of hatchery-supported trout waters in 25 western counties at 7 a.m. on April 5. The season will run through Feb. 28, 2015. While fishing on hatchery-supported trout waters, anglers can harvest a maximum of seven trout per day, with no minimum size limits or bait restrictions. Hatchery-supported trout waters are marked by green-and-white signs.  Learn more...

  • A close-up photograph of a rust colored crayfish.
    Rusty crayfish. Photo by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

    Rusty crayfish

    March 24, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission are asking anglers to help stop the spread of the rusty crayfish — a destructive, non-native crayfish that has invaded the upper Catawba River in western North Carolina. The rusty crayfish, which measures about 5 inches long, is native to the Ohio River watershed but can now be found in Canada and 17 other states, including North Carolina.  Learn more...

  • Grants for conservation and recreation

    March 17, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will distribute $1.1 billion to state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies as part of an annual distribution that has become one of the most sustainable sources of funding for conservation and recreation. In 1937, Congress passed the Pittman-Robertson Act, creating an excise tax on the sale of sporting firearms, ammunition, and archery equipment.  Learn more...

  • License plate design contest

    March 10, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, in partnership with students at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is holding a contest to generate a new license plate design for the Commission’s Wildlife Diversity Program, which does research, conservation and monitoring work benefiting nongame animals such as songbirds, sea turtles, eagles, salamanders, frogs, turtles, and bats. The Commission wants to update the current license plate logo, which features a northern cardinal and dogwood blossom, to a more striking image that reflects North Carolina’s native plants and animals.  Learn more...

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