skip to content

Tag: Asheville Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Asheville Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Eight fuzzy brown bats with large ears gathered in a small cluster on the roof of a cave.
    Information icon Small cluster of Virginia big-eared bats. Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Big-eared bat mystery solved in North Carolina

    March 21, 2019 | 6 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — A proposed highway widening project in 2010 led to the solution of a wildlife mystery, plus additional protection of North Carolina’s only endangered Virginia big-eared bat population. The Virginia big-eared bat was placed on the federal endangered species list in 1979. Found mainly in Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky, there is one population in North Carolina. In the early 1980s, scientists discovered two hibernation sites for that North Carolina population, a pair of caves at Grandfather Mountain.  Learn more...

  • A woman wearing a warm hat preparing to plant a tiny spruce tree seedling.
    Information icon Sue Cameron plants a red spruce at Whigg Meadow in Tennessee. Photo by Garry Peeples, USFWS.

    Women lead the effort on Appalachian mountain-top forests

    May 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The story of an ambitious effort to restore red spruce to the Southern Appalachians spearheaded by four women brought together by a commitment to the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River.  Learn more...

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered mussel making a comeback in the French Broad River

    March 22, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — In 1834, a freshwater mussel collected near the convergence of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers was recognized as a new species – the Appalachian elktoe. Eighty years later, Carnegie Museum curator and University of Pittsburg professor Arnold Ortman couldn’t find any elktoes in the French Broad River, attributing his failure to polluted water. Biologists search for Appalachian elktoes in the Mills River.  Learn more...

  • Water cascades over the edge of a dam strewn with logs and debris
    Information icon The Milburnie Dam, just east of Raleigh, has been demolished. The Neuse River now flows, unimpeded, about 150 miles to the Pamlico Sound. It clears the way for migratory fish to spawn upstream. Photo by Mike Wicker, USFWS.

    To the sea

    December 15, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Who knows how long the great river ran unimpeded from the pine forests and hardwoods to the sea? Scientists can only estimate. But they can tell you when that great river resumed its restless push to the Atlantic Ocean: Nov. 22, 2017. On that day, the Milburnie Dam crumbled. It was the last structure impeding the Neuse River’s flow across eastern North Carolina to the mouth of the Pamlico Sound, 150 miles to the east.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute read

    East Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground.  Learn more...

  • A small grey snail with a beige/white shell on top of a fallen leaf.
    Information icon Noonday globe snail. Photo by J. Fridell, USFWS.

    Endangered snail not only survives forest fire, but is now found in places never before seen

    July 5, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina - Wildlife biologists scaled the wall of the Nantahala Gorge on hands and knees - more climbing than hiking the steep terrain – searching for one of the rarest animals in the world in the wake of forest fires that burned through its habitat last winter. The noonday globe snail (Petera clarki nantahala) was placed on the federal endangered species list in 1978. The only place it was known to exist was a portion of the southern side of the Nantahala River Gorge, in North Carolina’s Swain County.  Learn more...

  • North Carolina biologist recognized for work to recover endangered species

    June 6, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recognized N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission biologist Rachael Hoch with its Recovery Champion award, recognizing her significant contribution to the recovery of federally threatened or endangered animals. For the past five years, Hoch has coordinated the state’s Conservation Aquaculture Center at the Marion Fish Hatchery, where she oversees the propagation and rearing of some of the rarest fish and mussels in the state.  Learn more...

News

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

  • A circular cloud pattern as seen from space.
    Information icon Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station. Photo by NASA.

    Florence being felt at Coastal Wildlife Refuges

    September 13, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Florence’s travel plans remain somewhat uncertain, even as it nears land with the promise of once-in-a-lifetime rainfall and flooding. The storm, now a Category 2 with winds hitting 110 mph, remains aimed at Wilmington, North Carolina, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) meteorologist Kevin Scasny told Service officials in a conference call with the agency’s Southeast regional office in Atlanta. The hurricane should strike the coastal city Friday, he said, but outer bands are already being felt at coastal wildlife refuges.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn