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Tag: Arkansas

The content below has been tagged with the term “Arkansas.”

Articles

  • Where the ducks are

    May 29, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Augusta, Arkansas - On a clear January evening at Cache River National Wildlife Refuge, the sun soothed the sky into a pink glow. The mass of ducks quacking sounded like laughter, as they dropped into the sunlit forest that lined both sides of the refuge. Without the protected wetlands along the river, there would be no ducks. The thought is hard to imagine, considering duck hunting is so ingrained in the culture that duck blinds are like an inheritance.  Learn more...

  • Large brick building.
    Information icon Mammoth Spring Aquatic Conservation Center. Photo by Sara Seagraves, USFWS.

    Southeast Region snags Environmental Leadership awards

    March 16, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Southeast Region swept both of the Interior’s 2017 Environmental Leadership awards for energy conservation accomplishments in 2016. Congratulations to Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge and Mammoth Springs National Fish Hatchery, both located in Arkansas, for facility upgrades that won them Refuge of the Year and Fish Hatchery of the Year, respectively. Both facilities achieved LEED Silver status from the U.S. Green Building Council in 2016.  Learn more...

  • Aerial photo of the education center with colorful fields of flowers and a red visitors center.
    Information icon The Fred Berry Conservation Education Center in Arkansas sits on 21 acres donated by a retired schoolteacher. The center is restoring some of the land to native grassland/savanna habitat with funding provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

    One project, many outcomes

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    One of the great things about habitat improvement projects is that a seemingly simple project can lead to many conservation outcomes. That has been the case with the native grassland restoration project on the Fred Berry Conservation Education Center, located on Crooked Creek in Marion County, Arkansas. The 421-acre property, which is managed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC), lies within a long 2.75-mile bend of Crooked Creek, a premier smallmouth bass stream, in the Arkansas Ozarks.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

News

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • Secretary Zinke expands hunting and fishing opportunities at 30 of America’s National Wildlife Refuges

    September 7, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Washington, DC — Continuing his efforts to increase access to public lands, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke will open more than 251,000 acres to new or expanded hunting and fishing opportunities at 30 national wildlife refuges across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System. This will now bring the number of units where the public may hunt to 377, and the number where fishing is permitted to 312.  Read the full story...

  • Draft recovery plan for endangered Neosho mucket available

    August 16, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The Neosho mucket is a freshwater mussel that grows up to five inches long, which is large for a mussel, and is found in river basins in Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri. It was listed as an endangered species in 2013 under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has been working closely with private landowners and communities, state and federal agencies, universities, and conservation institutes, to survey for individuals and protect and restore the mussel’s habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A light brown fish with bright orange markings on the tops of its fins.
    Information icon Yellowcheek darter. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered yellowcheek darter

    July 5, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the final recovery plan for the yellowcheek darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The yellowcheek darter is a small fish native to the Little Red River basin in Arkansas. It is found in headwater streams with clear water, permanent flow, moderate to strong riffles, and gravel, rubble, and boulder substrates. Historically, the yellowcheek darter has been found in the Little Red River and its four major forks (Devils, Middle, South, and Archey) in Cleburne, Searcy, Stone, and Van Buren counties.  Read the full story...

  • Secretary Zinke announces more that $1.1 billion for sportsmen and conservation

    March 20, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Horicon, Wisconsin – Today U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke traveled to Horicon, Wisconsin, where he announced more than $1.1 billion in annual national funding for state wildlife agencies from revenues generated by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration (PRDJ) acts. The Secretary presented a ceremonial check to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for $34,966,603 while visiting the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area. Download state-by-state listings of the final Fiscal Year 2018 apportionments of the Wildlife Restoration Program fund and the Sport Fish Restoration Program fund.  Read the full story...

  • A tiny yellow/orange frog with big round eyes.
    Coqui Llanero. Photo by Luis J. Villanueva CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species

    March 9, 2018 | 3 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of eight endangered fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before May 11, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

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