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Tag: Arkansas

The content below has been tagged with the term “Arkansas.”

Wildlife

  • A prehistoric looking fish with spines down its back and sides.
    Information icon Lake sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    Lake sturgeon

    Taxon: Freshwater Fish Range: Freshwater systems of North America from the Hudson Bay through the Mississippi River drainages Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Lake sturgeon is listed as threatened at the state level in 19 of the 20 states it inhabits. Lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) is a temperate fish occurring in freshwater systems of North America from the Hudson Bay through the Mississippi River drainages.  Visit the species profile...

  • A close-up shot of a duck with a dark head and light blue beak
    Information icon Lesser scaup. Photo by Heath Hagy, USFWS.

    Lesser scaup

    The lesser scaup is a medium-bodied diving duck, meaning they feed by diving under the surface of deep water to find their food. Males have a dark emerald to black head and a mostly gray to white body. Females are mostly brown on their body and have a dark brown head with a white patch at the base of the bill. Scaup have evolved a bill structure perfect for catching invertebrates swimming in the water column.  Visit the species profile...

  • Male and female mallard ducks on a lake
    Information icon Mallards at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt, USFWS.

    Mallard

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Mallards occur year-round throughout North America, but most individuals are migratory and breed in the northern United States and Canada and winter in the Southern United States and Mexico. Most of the breeding population occurs in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and central Canada. Status: Not listed, low concern – In 2018, the breeding population size exceeded 10 million in the traditional and eastern survey areas of North America.  Visit the species profile...

  • Eight northern pintails including two females and six males on a cold, winter lake
    Information icon Northern pintails at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Northern pintail

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Northern pintail typically breed in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States, central Canada, and Alaska. They spend their winters in the southern United States and Mexico, especially along the Texas and Louisiana coasts of the Gulf of Mexico. Status: Not listed, low concern – More than 2.3 million northern pintail were estimated in the breeding population in 2018. However, substantial declines since the 1950s has resulted in restricted harvest regulations for this species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A duck with bright green head and tail feathers swimming
    Information icon Northern shoveler. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Northern shoveler

    The northern shoveler is a medium-sized dabbling duck, or a duck that feeds by tipping headfirst into shallow water. This species is well-known for its bill, which has a spoon or shovel shape. Because of this unique bill, they have earned the nicknames “spoonbill” and “spoony”. It uses this bill and hundreds of comb-like structures called lamellae to filter tiny zooplankton from the water. Males of this species are brightly colored, with an orange body, white chest, deep green head, and brilliant blue wing patches.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful trout in hand with a smiling angler in the background.
    Beautiful rainbow trout. Photo by Cale Bruckner, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Rainbow trout

    Rainbow trout are a North American game fish that get their name from the beautiful colors that shine on their skin. Coloration of the fish varies widely in relationship to sex, habitat, and maturity.  Visit the species profile...

  • A grey and black duck with a rusty orange colored head
    Information icon A redhead duck. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Redhead

    Redheads are large diving ducks that feed by diving below the water’s surface looking for plant tubers and other foods. This species often occurs in large flocks, called rafts, especially during winter. This duck is known for its rounded, bright red head, two tone bill, and gray back. Conservation status Low concern. Although this species is hunted, harvest is tightly restricted as there are concerns over the potential effects of harvest on population sustainability.  Visit the species profile...

  • A duck with long green and brown feathers on its head in the shape of a backwards-hat
    Information icon A wood duck at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Robin Koch, USFWS volunteer.

    Wood duck

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Wood ducks are common year-round in the Southeastern United States and during summer and autumn throughout the Eastern United States and Canada. Wood ducks breed in most states east of the Rocky Mountains and throughout the Pacific Northwest, but they migrate from northern states and provinces to southern areas during early fall. Status: Not listed, low concern – Although breeding population estimates are not available for wood ducks based on breeding surveys, perhaps as many as 3 million breeding pairs exist across North America.  Visit the species profile...

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