skip to content

Tag: Arkansas Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Arkansas Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A bright white bird with a red patch on its head and identifying tags on its legs wads through a marsh
    Information icon Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall.

    Female whooping crane visits Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    November 15, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Arkansas’ Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge is hosting a Louisiana reared whooping crane. The first observation of the crane on the refuge was October 3. According to Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologist Sara Zimorski, this crane is a 2 1⁄2-year-old female that was released in 2017. Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall. Unlike most of the juveniles released at the same time, she took off immediately, has spent more time outside of Louisiana than in it, and has covered a lot of ground in two years.  Learn more...

Faq

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Removal of interior least tern from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife - Questions and answers

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    What is an interior least tern? Least terns are the smallest members of the tern family. Terns are generally considered seabirds, but several species are also found along rivers, lakes, or other wetlands. The interior least tern is a migratory bird species, nesting along freshwater habitats of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and their major tributaries and overwintering in the Caribbean and South America. Least terns feed primarily on small fish.  Learn more...

  • A blackish/navy blue bird with bright red eyes and white markings on its wings
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo by Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Eastern black rail - final 4(d) rule

    October 7, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species. The ESA provides a specific list of prohibitions for endangered species under section 9, but does not automatically provide these same prohibitions to threatened species. Section 4(d) of the ESA allows the Service to establish prohibitions or exceptions to prohibitions for threatened species. The intent of any 4(d) rule is to provide for the conservation of a threatened species by allowing regulatory flexibility under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail final listing as a threatened species

    October 7, 2020 | 14 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing a rule to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  Learn more...

News

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Trump Administration celebrates recovery of America’s smallest tern

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    After more than three decades of conservation partnerships inspired by the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is celebrating the delisting of the interior least tern due to recovery. According to the best available science, the diverse efforts of local, state and federal stakeholders across the interior least tern’s 18-state range have helped ensure populations are healthy, stable and increasing into the foreseeable future. The tern will continue to be protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service finalizes listing the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 7, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The eastern black rail, a small, secretive marsh bird historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil, and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America, will be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final listing includes a rule that will help ensure beneficial conservation actions continue, while minimizing impacts to landowners and other stakeholders. Critical habitat designation for the eastern black rail was deemed not prudent.  Read the full story...

  • A small, beige minnow-like fish with a dark stripe down its side
    Information icon Ozark chub. Photo by Dustin Lynch, Arkansas Natural Heritage Comission.

    Improved science and conservation partnerships mean a Southeastern fish and flowering plant do not need Endangered Species Act protections

    December 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Based on an extensive review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the Ozark chub and the purpledisk honeycombhead do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Protection of these species on conservation lands and new survey data helped inform the Service’s decisions not to list these species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). These not warranted findings are due in part to ESA-inspired partnerships between local, state and federal stakeholders, who collaborated to protect and conserve these species before they required federal protections.  Read the full story...

  • Two black and white birds on the edge of a body of water.
    Information icon Interior least tern. Photo by USFWS.

    Recovery of America’s smallest tern prompts proposal to delist

    October 23, 2019 | 5 minute read

    When the interior least tern was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1985, there were fewer than 2,000 birds and only a few dozen nesting sites scattered across a once-expansive range that covered America’s Great Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley. Today there are more than 18,000 interior least terns at more than 480 nesting sites in 18 states, thanks to decades of innovative conservation efforts and diverse partnerships among local, state and federal stakeholders.  Read the full story...

  • A light brown snake with darker black and brown markings on a green vine.
    Puerto Rican boa. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 43 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 21 recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 43 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. The effort calls for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A green plant with serrated edges and a brown stem with a cylindrical orange flower.
    Information icon *Gesneria pauciflora* (no common name). Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, USFWS.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 53 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 28 Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 53 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals, which call for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery, by September 2019.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn