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Tag: Appalachian Elktoe

The content below has been tagged with the term “Appalachian Elktoe.”

Articles

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered mussel making a comeback in the French Broad River

    March 22, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — In 1834, a freshwater mussel collected near the convergence of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers was recognized as a new species – the Appalachian elktoe. Eighty years later, Carnegie Museum curator and University of Pittsburg professor Arnold Ortman couldn’t find any elktoes in the French Broad River, attributing his failure to polluted water. Biologists search for Appalachian elktoes in the Mills River.  Learn more...

  • North Carolina biologist recognized for work to recover endangered species

    June 6, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recognized N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission biologist Rachael Hoch with its Recovery Champion award, recognizing her significant contribution to the recovery of federally threatened or endangered animals. For the past five years, Hoch has coordinated the state’s Conservation Aquaculture Center at the Marion Fish Hatchery, where she oversees the propagation and rearing of some of the rarest fish and mussels in the state.  Learn more...

News

  • A spiny flower with thin, bright purple petals.
    Information icon Smooth Purple Coneflower, Echinacea laevigata. Photo by Suzanne Cadwell, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions

    May 19, 2017 | 8 minute read

    On Endangered Species Day, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region celebrates the contributions and achievements of our nationally recognized Recovery Champions and regionally recognized Recovery Champions. These dedicated individuals have devoted themselves to recovering endangered and threatened animals and plants, and the Service is grateful for their hard work. 2016 National Recovery Champions Chris Lucash, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Chris Lucash in the field monitoring for red wolves.  Read the full story...

  • Heavy equipment works away at a decrepit concrete dam.
    Information icon Cane River dam removal in process. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Cane river dam removal

    April 13, 2017 | 3 minute read

    In the fall of 2016, the final piece of concrete was removed from the Cane River Dam, in North Carolina’s Yancey County, completing a process started eight years earlier. Built in the early 20th century, it’s hydropower generating house once provided all the electricity used in the county, but decades ago it was damaged, fell into disrepair, and has deteriorated ever since. The Cane River is home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel, making it a priority area for U.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Tall stems extending from the forest floor give way to bright white dangling flowers.
    Information icon White fringeless orchid. Photo by USFWS.

    North Carolina receives bog conservation grant

    August 24, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced 37.2 million dollars in grants to 20 states to support the conservation of threatened and endangered species across the nation, and a portion of that money is coming to the southern Appalachians. The North Carolina Plant Conservation Program is receiving more than $41,000 to help acquire seven Henderson County acres that are home to an endangered and a threatened plant.  Learn more...

  • Mussels being cultivated in the lab
    Information icon Lampsilis mussels at the NCWRC’s Conservation Aquaculture Center. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    North Carolinas Conservation Aquaculture Center

    June 2, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It’s a non-descript metal building in a compound tucked on the edge of Marion, North Carolina. From the outside, it looks like just another small warehouse. However, step inside and it’s clear you’re in no warehouse. This is the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission’s Conservation Aquaculture Center. Inside, the hum of water pumps fills the air, and you see shelves filled with water basins and a network of PVC pipes moving water through them.  Learn more...

  • A group of children runs through shallow water with a net in the foreground.
    Collecting fish in the North Toe River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Economic impact of the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program

    May 26, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We all stood on the bank of Mitchell County’s North Toe River, watching as the track hoe chipped away at the old, decrepit Spruce-Pine dam. Removing the crumbling dam allowed fish to move upstream and take advantage of that habitat, and removed a safety hazard for local paddlers. The dam’s removal was paid for in part by Partners for Fish and Wildlife, a program of the U.  Learn more...

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Reviewing the status of endangered plants and animals

    March 3, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Appalachian elktoe is a an endangered freshwater mussel found in a handful of Western North Carolina Rivers, and in a sliver of the Nolichucky River in East Tennessee. For years the plight of the elktoe looked to be improving. The Cheoah River population was expanding thanks to the return of water previously piped overland to a power generating station.  Learn more...

  • A hand holding two orange/black mussels with gold plates with an identifying number.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe from the Cane River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian elktoe conservation

    February 13, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, and to celebrate, we’re taking a closer look at some of the endangered species found in the Southern Appalachians. In a building at a state fish hatchery in Marion, North Carolina are a series of tubs with an elaborate piping network leading in and out. Within these tubs the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is working to rear some of North Carolina’s most endangered freshwater mussels in captivity, including the Appalachian elktoe mussel.  Learn more...

  • A hand holding two orange/black mussels with gold plates with an identifying number.
    Appalachian elktoe from the Cane River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Rearing Appalachian elktoes in captivity

    March 28, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. A standard tool for biologists working to recover endangered species is either breeding rare plants or animals in captivity or raising them in captivity to increase their likelihood of survival. This can be quite complicated, as it involves plants or animals that are extremely rare, and for which we know little about their life cycles. In the shadow of the Whittier, North Carolina post office, state and federal biologists searched the bottom of the Tuckasegee River for Appalachian elktoe mussels.  Learn more...

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