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Tag: Apalachicola River

The content below has been tagged with the term “Apalachicola River.”

Articles

  • A sign explains the hirstorical significance of the Florida torreya with a white house in the background.
    Information icon The Gregory House with propped-up torreya. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Saving the Florida torreya

    April 22, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Bristol, Florida — The Florida torreya was one of the world’s most endangered trees even before Hurricane Michael savaged the remaining wild specimens along the Apalachicola River with 100-plus mph winds in October 2018. It was also one of the most controversial trees, Exhibit A in a roiling debate over how, and where, to keep alive species facing extinction. More than 650,000 torreyas once lined the ridgelines or hugged the ravines near the Apalachicola and Flint rivers.  Learn more...

News

  • A turtle basking on a log overhanging a pool of water.
    Information icon Adult female Barbour’s map turtle on the Chipola River. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    Endangered species listing not needed for three species of wildlife in the Southeast

    October 4, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded the Barbour’s map turtle, the Florida Keys mole skink, and the Big Blue Springs cave crayfish do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future and do not require Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections. Based on a rigorous review of the science, the Service has determined that all three species have healthy and stable populations, primary stressors do not threaten their survival in the wild, and adequate conservation measures are in place for each.  Read the full story...

  • A small black snake with sparse white scales coiled in an outstretched hand.
    Information icon A juvenile eastern indigo snake.

    A recovery milestone: Threatened eastern indigo snake reintroduced to Florida Panhandle

    July 17, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida – The federally threatened eastern indigo snake, an icon of the southern longleaf pine forest, was reintroduced to northern Florida today at The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP). The release of 12 indigo snakes, the first of many planned releases, is a key step towards the species’ recovery in the region. “The eastern indigo snake has been listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act since 1978, and today’s release is an important milestone in our efforts toward recovering this important reptile,” said Cindy Dohner, regional director for the U.  Read the full story...

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