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Tag: American Eel

The content below has been tagged with the term “American Eel.”

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  • Illustration of an eel transitioning from dark green on it's top to a white belly with a long dorsal fin.
    American eel. Illustration by Duane Raver, USFWS.

    Is the American eel an endangered species?

    October 10, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Salmon are perhaps the most famous migratory fish in the United States, but here in the east, from Greenland to South America, we have the American eel. Spending most of it’s time in rivers, all American eels migrate to the Sargasso Sea to reproduce, and then young eels return to rivers to become adults. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced that the American eel may need federal protection as a threatened or endangered species, following review of a request to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act.  Learn more...

  • A biologist holds a silver/white fish next to a large ruler for measurement
    American shad. Photo by FWC

    Santee-Cooper Accord helps move migratory fish across the Carolinas

    January 9, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Santee River basin begins in Western North Carolina, where the headwaters of the Catawba, Broad, and Pacolet Rivers trickle down from the Eastern Continental divide. The basin includes the Congaree, Saluda, Wateree and a host of other rivers, eventually all joining to form the Santee River which empties into the ocean north of Charleston. It’s a basin whose rivers are punctuated by dams that provide electricity to Charlotte, Greenville and Columbia.  Learn more...

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