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Tag: Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.”

Articles

  • Two children with a camera peer out of the moon roof of a red truck.
    Information icon When a bear is spotted in a field, the caravan stops and Jack and Gretchen Boggs are among those taking pictures of the wild animal. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    In search of the Bear Necessities

    July 5, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Dare County, North Carolina - The caravan of cars crunches slowly, single-file, down a narrow gravel road that leads deeper into Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in North Carolina. Herons alongside the road stare at the passing cars, and the passengers stare back at the herons. Overhead a gliding hawk catches air drafts. Herons and hawks are all well and good. But we are here for bears. Black bears. “We’re not a zoo,” Cindy Heffley, a visitor services specialist for the U.  Learn more...

News

  • A circular cloud seen from space.
    Information icon Hurricane Florence from the International Space Station. Photo by Astronaut Ricky Arnold, NASA.

    Service prepares for Hurricane Florence impact in Carolinas

    September 11, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Florence has the Carolinas in her sights. The Category 4 storm, with winds of up to 130 miles per hour, is expected to hit the North Carolina coast north of Wilmington late Thursday night, bringing a storm surge of 4-12 feet, according to Kevin Scasny, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) meteorologist. Florence has the potential to cause “catastrophic damage,” Scasny said Tuesday morning on a planning conference call conducted by the Service.  Read the full story...

  • A red wolf in a full run on a grassy field.
    Information icon A sprinting red wolf. Photo by Curtis Carley for USFWS.

    Service proposes new management rule for non-essential, experimental population of red wolves in North Carolina

    June 27, 2018 | 3 minute read

    More than 30 years ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners began efforts to reintroduce the endangered red wolf into the wild in North Carolina. While many of the captive-bred wolves adapted well to a wild environment, the program faced unforeseen challenges, including hybridization of wolves with coyotes and conflicts with humans. After initially increasing, the population plateaued and then declined. Today, only approximately 35 wild wolves remain, with a further 200-plus wolves in captive breeding facilities.  Read the full story...

  • An orange caution sign warns about smoke ahead.
    Information icon A prescribed fire at Savannah NWR in Georgia. Photo by Judy Doyle, USFWS.

    2009 prescribed burning projections announced for Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

    January 9, 2009 | 3 minute read

    Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge is busy preparing for another prescribed burn season. Generally, the burn season begins in the fall and runs through mid-spring, but the 2008 fall weather conditions were not conducive to burning. In addition, some units may be burned outside this range to accomplish management objectives. Prescribed burns are management-ignited fires conducted for specific management objectives under specified conditions. Objectives include reducing pine straw, dead grass, shrubs, and other vegetation that could fuel an uncontrolled wildfire, as well as rejuvenating marshes and other habitat types by removing dead grass and encroaching shrubs.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Sunset over waterbody.
    Information icon Night falls at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Joy Campbell of Okefenokee Adventures.

    Toe River Valley River Trail

    November 30, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Today we’ll examine an effort to increase accessibility to one of the most beautiful corners of the Southern Appalachians. In Okefenokee Swamp National Wildlife refuge, there is little hiking, simply because there is little dry earth, however, visitors routinely traverse the refuge, camping in it’s backcountry and enjoying the alligators, turtles, and birds this southeast Georgia wilderness offers. Instead of being laced with hiking trails, the area is laced with paddling trails, with backcountry visitors paddling through the swamp from wooden camping platform to wooden camping platform.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • An adult wolf walking in an enclosure at the zoo.
    Information icon Captive red wolf at Species Survival Plan facility, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium (Tacoma, WA). Photo by B. Bartel, USFWS.

    Red wolf

    Once common throughout the Eastern and South Central United States, red wolf populations were decimated by the early 20th century as a result of intensive predator control programs and the degradation and alteration of the species’ habitat. When the red wolf was designated endangered in 1967, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service initiated efforts to conserve and recover the species.  Visit the species profile...

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