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Tag: Alabama

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alabama.”

Articles

  • A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.
    Information icon The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

    Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Hurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds.  Learn more...

  • A tiny loggerhead hatchling hustles towards the ocean.
    Loggerhead hatchling meets ocean. Photo by Becky Skiba, USFWS.

    Moonlighting in Alabama

    November 6, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Lisa was keeping a watchful eye on a sea turtle nest, which laid beneath the sand. A Share the Beach volunteer for more than 16 years, Graham knew the routine: a female sea turtle nested in that spot two months ago, which meant the eggs could hatch at any time.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    Frequently asked questions for the proposed listing of the trispot darter

    October 3, 2017 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the Service is proposing to list the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What does it mean when a species is threatened? A species is listed in one of two categories: endangered or threatened. An endangered species is one that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

  • A turtle basking on a log overhanging a pool of water.
    Information icon Adult female Barbour’s map turtle on the Chipola River. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    Endangered species listing not needed for three species of wildlife in the Southeast

    October 4, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded the Barbour’s map turtle, the Florida Keys mole skink, and the Big Blue Springs cave crayfish do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future and do not require Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections. Based on a rigorous review of the science, the Service has determined that all three species have healthy and stable populations, primary stressors do not threaten their survival in the wild, and adequate conservation measures are in place for each.  Read the full story...

  • A colorful radar map.
    Information icon Weather radar for the Eastern Atlantic Ocean.

    Rain coming

    October 4, 2017 | 2 minute read

    A storm is brewing off the coast of Nicaragua that could drench the Florida Keys, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service meteorologist said Wednesday. At worst, the storm could develop into a “minimal hurricane” that could make landfall late this weekend around Louisiana, said meteorologist Kevin Scasny. He shared the forecast with other Service employees during a morning conference call focusing on cleanup efforts in the Caribbean following Hurricane Maria.  Read the full story...

  • A greyish green fish with a long body and blueish grey fins.
    Information icon Bridled darter. Photo by Noel Burkhead, United States Geological Survey.

    Endangered Species Act protection not needed for two Coosa darters

    October 3, 2017 | 2 minute read

    After a scientifically rigorous process, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has concluded instead that the holiday darter and bridled darter populations are stable, being conserved through existing regulations, and do not need protection. The holiday darter is a small freshwater fish found in small creeks to moderate-sized rivers above the fall line in the Ridge and Valley, Blue Ridge, and Piedmont provinces of Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. The Service reviewed seven populations for the holiday darter, and all seven populations still exist within the current range.  Read the full story...

  • A dozen large birds on the edge of a mangrove island.
    Information icon Brown pelican chicks on mangrove island. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS.

    How to manage 45 important coastal species in the face of environmental changes

    October 3, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Salt marshes, mangrove forests, and barrier beaches are home to a diversity of wildlife species, and when these coastal ecosystems are intact and functional, they benefit communities as well as wildlife.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes protection for rare darter in Coosa River Basin

    October 3, 2017 | 4 minute read

    A unique fish that acts like a tiny salmon needs protection. The trispot darter, a small, colorful fish found in parts of the Coosa River Basin in southeastern Tennessee, northern Georgia, and northern Alabama, is disappearing. Following a scientifically rigorous review of the darter, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proposing to list the species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Every year this short-lived fish, which is less than two inches long, swims upstream from the larger river habitat where it usually lives so it can spawn in the vegetation of small tributaries and seeps.  Read the full story...

  • A group of USFWS personnel in a circle for a meeting.
    Incident Commander a Sami Gray briefs N MS Task Force team before heading into Big Pine Key to provide support following hurricane. Photo by USFWS.

    Service crews head south

    September 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma had hardly dissipated before U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Service) crews headed south, tracing in reverse the path the storm had cut across Florida and Georgia. In trucks and cars they crossed into Florida, or headed for south Georgia. The teams are bringing fuel, water, food, chainsaws and more to look after people and places in Irma’s path. Crews ran into “logistical challenges” on interstates crowded with evacuees headed home, said Sami Gray, who is leading the Service’s response effort.  Read the full story...

  • Three men meet before deloying with heavy equipment.
    Information icon USFWS employees at Mississippi Sandhill Crane finalize their equipment and supply checks before responding to Florida to support the Irma recovery response in Florida. Photo by USFWS.

    Service assesses damage, starts cleanup

    September 12, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Hurricane Irma, once a category 5 storm, has nearly played itself out. As of Tuesday, Sept. 12, the storm that howled up the west coast of Florida had dwindled to gusts and rain over North Carolina – a tempest, still, but nothing like the terror that came ashore two days earlier. Weather in Florida is returning to what is normal this time of year, said Kevin Scasny, a meteorologist with the U.  Read the full story...

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