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Tag: Alabama

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alabama.”

Articles

  • Dozens gather for a ribbon cutting ceremony.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge staff members Jereme Phillips and Brittany Petersen mark the reopening of the Jeff Friend Trail with help from the Blue Goose, the mascot of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Bon Secour trail reopening underscores priority of access to public lands

    March 15, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Gulf Shores is not only one of the largest undeveloped parcels of land on the Alabama coast, it’s also one of the few places where you can go from the primary dunes along the Gulf of Mexico to a maritime forest and uplands. “It’s like a snapshot of what the Gulf coast was like hundreds and thousands of years ago,” says Jereme Phillips, the refuge manager.  Learn more...

  • two yellow flowers growing out of very sandy soil.
    Information icon Ground chokecherry. Photo by USFWS.

    Sowing plants to reap dunes

    February 28, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Restoration biologist Kate Healy felt the sun on her face as she stood on a sandy stretch of beach along Alabama’s Gulf coast. It was an unseasonably warm day on Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, and Healy, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf Restoration Office in Fairhope, Alabama, was ready to get to work. Kate Healy and Jackie Sablan plant ground chokecherry at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama.  Learn more...

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    Steward of the land

    February 14, 2018 | 5 minute read

    It started with quail, and then the woodpeckers upped the stakes. Cam Lanier owned one large quail-hunting plantation not far from his home in Lanett, Alabama, named Sehoy, and part of another next door, named Enon. But a timber company owned the other section of Enon Plantation. Cam Lanier bought Enon and Sehoy Plantations for quail hunting, but has added conservation of red-cockaded woodpeckers as a purpose. Photo courtesy of Cam Lanier.  Learn more...

  • Three men posing for a photo in camouflage after a day of waterfowl hunting.
    Information icon Lane, Mark and John Bowie at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama. Lane is a sixth-grader who has gone hunting with his dad and grandpa since he was 7 years old. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Making memories in a duck blind

    February 12, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama – “Some of the best memories are made even if you don’t pull the trigger” is a saying that circulates among some hunters. At 4:30 a.m., 12-year-old Lane Bowie is scrunched in the backseat of his grandpa’s truck playing a video game on his phone, one that involves frantic thumb movements and never-ending explosions on the little screen. At about 4:30 a.  Learn more...

  • A tiny white and brown mouse held by a biologist.
    Perdido Key beach mouse. Photo by USFWS.

    The mouse that roared

    December 13, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Pensacola, Florida – Pity the big-eared, bug-eyed Perdido Key Beach mouse. Buffeted by hurricanes, threatened by development, and stalked by cats, the thumb-sized mouse had all but disappeared from the sliver of beach outside this bustling Gulf Coast town. A decade ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service feared extinction. Paw prints from a Perdido Key beach mouse. Photo by USFWS. Today? “The mouse is doing pretty well right now,” said Kristi Yanchis, a Service biologist and beach mouse expert.  Learn more...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    The woodpecker’s journey

    November 20, 2017 | 9 minute read

    It was getting dark. A light rain fell. Distant thunder rolled across the steamy, late-summer sky. The hunters were apprehensive. Their prey: endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers.  Learn more...

  • A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.
    Information icon The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

    Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Hurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A light purple salamander with dark spots and tufts above its front legs.
    Information icon Black Warrior waterdog. Photo by Joseph Jenkins, Alabama Natural Heritage Program.

    Final listing, critical habitat designation and draft economic analysis for the Black Warrior waterdog

    January 2, 2018 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? Based on a review of the best available information and a full species status assessment, the Service is listing the Black Warrior waterdog as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is proposing to designate 420 river miles of critical habitat in four units. What does it mean when a species is endangered? Species are listed under the ESA in one of two categories: endangered or threatened.  Learn more...

News

  • A light purple salamander with dark spots and tufts above its front legs.
    Information icon Black Warrior waterdog. Photo by Joseph Jenkins, Alabama Natural Heritage Program.

    Alabama “mudpuppy” to receive federal protection

    January 2, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The Black Warrior waterdog, a large aquatic salamander found only in the Black Warrior River Basin in Alabama, is now a federally protected species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) listed the salamander as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), meaning it is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A rigorous review of the best available science has found low and declining population numbers due to loss and fragmentation of its habitat and poor water quality in the Black Warrior River Basin.  Read the full story...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

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