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Tag: Alabama

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alabama.”

Articles

  • Water runs through a rocky stream at the edge of a gravel road.
    Information icon On the site of the obsolete old bridge, a new wet ford allows timber trucks to drive across, and fish to swim freely. Photo by Laura Fogo, USFWS.

    Go with the flow

    August 31, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Like all freshwater mussels, the brook floater and Savannah lilliput that live in Densons Creek are dependent on the kindness of strangers. The strangers in this case are fish like minnows and sunfish. The mussels produce tiny offspring, no bigger than a pin head, which attach to the fish’s gills. When the fish swims away with the young mussels attached, the mussels are carried to new locations where they drop off the fish and begin their life in the stream bottom.  Learn more...

  • A man wearing a yellow hard hat and firefighting gear
    Information icon Stephen McGuin. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    On the front lines

    July 27, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Austin Griffin and Stephen McGuin are training to become wildland firefighters, an odd career choice given their unusual, at-times troubled backgrounds. Yet they’re perfect fits for a still-new training program crafted by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to put a diverse and economically disadvantaged cadre of young men and women on the front firefighting lines.  Learn more...

  • hundreds of birds dot a small island below a bright blue sky.
    Information icon DOI is leading a $72 million restoration of Breton Island off the coast of Louisiana that will benefit brown pelicans, terns, skimmers and gulls. Photo by Brian Spears, USFWS.

    Meet the Gulf Restoration Office

    May 31, 2018 | 3 minute read

    As the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service rolled into fiscal year 2018, we ushered in many exciting changes to our Gulf of Mexico restoration initiative that emerged from the Global Settlement for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This comprehensive legal settlement resolved the governments’ civil claims under the Clean Water Act and natural resources damage claims under the Oil Pollution Act stemming from the 2010 disaster in the Gulf, the largest offshore oil spill in history.  Learn more...

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Andalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS.  Learn more...

  • A creek runs through a forest.
    Information icon Ohatchee creek, a tributary of the Coosa River in Alabama. Photo by Paul Johnson, ADCNR.

    Stalking the rare painted rocksnail

    April 12, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Calhoun County, Alabama — Biologists Nathan Whelan and Paul Johnson weren’t sure what they’d find when they launched their boat on that balmy Alabama morning. Whelan, a biologist currently serving as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s regional geneticist for the Southeast Region, was updating a scientific manuscript on the painted rocksnail, and needed the most recent information on its current range. The painted rocksnail is a rather cryptic-looking small-to-medium sized freshwater snail with yellowish-brown coloring.  Learn more...

  • A half dozen large silver fish jumping out of the water to a height of six feet.
    Information icon School of jumping silver carp. Photo by Ryan Hagerty, USFWS.

    A war in the water

    March 19, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Eastport, Mississippi — This stretch of the Tennessee River is considered the most aquatically biodiverse in the nation, teeming with sportfish and at-risk snails and mussels. Locals boast that Pickwick Lake, where Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee come together, is “the smallmouth bass capital of the world.” Catfish and buffalo fill commercial angler’s nets. Marinas lining the reservoir’s roads attest to Pickwick’s huge economic impact. Yet the Tennessee River, and a way of life, is under siege.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A crayfish with brown and white splotches and narrow claws with deep red tips
    Information icon Slenderclaw crayfish (Cambarus cracens). Photo © Guenter Schuster.

    Slenderclaw crayfish listing proposal, 4(d) Rule, Critical Habitat

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    What action is being proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? As a result of the completion of a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding, the Service is proposing to list the slenderclaw crayfish as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) with a 4(d) rule and designate critical habitat. An SSA is an in-depth review of the species’ biology and threats, an evaluation of its biological status, and an assessment of the resources and conditions needed to maintain long-term viability.  Learn more...

News

  • A crayfish with brown and white splotches and narrow claws with deep red tips
    Information icon Slenderclaw crayfish (Cambarus cracens). Photo © Guenter Schuster.

    Service proposes to list rare freshwater crayfish, designate Critical Habitat

    October 5, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list the slenderclaw crayfish as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). At the same time, it also is proposing to designate critical habitat and a 4(d) rule describing management activities that would continue to be permitted because of the benefit to the crayfish and landowners. With two known populations, the slenderclaw crayfish is disappearing throughout its range. Historically, the crayfish was known to live in four small streams or tributaries within the Short Creek and Town Creek watersheds, both in the Tennessee River Basin in Dekalb and Marshall counties, Alabama.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • Secretary Zinke announces more that $1.1 billion for sportsmen and conservation

    March 20, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Horicon, Wisconsin – Today U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke traveled to Horicon, Wisconsin, where he announced more than $1.1 billion in annual national funding for state wildlife agencies from revenues generated by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration (PRDJ) acts. The Secretary presented a ceremonial check to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for $34,966,603 while visiting the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area. Download state-by-state listings of the final Fiscal Year 2018 apportionments of the Wildlife Restoration Program fund and the Sport Fish Restoration Program fund.  Read the full story...

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