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Tag: Alabama

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alabama.”

Articles

  • A marsh at low tide exposes a mud flat with sparse pine trees in the distance.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Coastal Alabama refuge adds land

    April 26, 2019 | 3 minute read

    A jewel of an ecosystem just grew by more than 350 football fields, thanks to a partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and several partners. The land in question: the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, a roughly 7,000-acre tract near Gulf Shores, Alabama. It’s called the Little Point Clear Unit — two parcels comprising 470 acres, enough land to accommodate 355 football games. It became a formal part of the refuge April 26.  Learn more...

  • A blue sky partially obscured by tall green pine trees.
    Information icon Longleaf pine stand located in the Coastal Headwaters forest in Alabama. Photo by USDA.

    Coastal Headwaters project in Florida is a major step for longleaf pine restoration

    April 24, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Pace, Florida — Rarely has the establishment of a conservation easement generated such fanfare. But dozens of public, private and nonprofit officials on Wednesday extolled the wonders of the permanent setting-aside of 3,719 acres of forested land. Coastal Headwaters Longleaf Forest; Healthy Forest Reserve Program Conservation Easement. Map by Roberta Moore, The Conservation Fund. This, though, was no ordinary celebration. It’s likely the first of many such easements intended to restore majestic longleaf pine stands across a large swath of private property.  Learn more...

  • water topels over a foot drop after a dam was removed on the Sucarnoochee River.
    Information icon Native fishes and mussels can move upstream after removal of Livingston Dam in Alabama. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Livingston Dam: A restoration story

    April 10, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Livingston, Alabama — The Sucarnoochee River is a sleepy coastal plain river that snakes its way through the Black Belt (the band of fertile soil crossing central Alabama and northeast Mississippi), near the University of West Alabama. The ‘nooch has only been studied by a handful of scientists and is not well known as a major tourist destination. Home to unique animals with comparably unique names, like bankclimber, fawnsfoot, Alabama orb, bluehead chub, and naked sand darter, this river contributes to the state of Alabama’s depth of aquatic biodiversity.  Learn more...

  • A man wearing a camouflage hoodie posing for a photo on a gravel road
    Information icon Stephen Scott, longtime Hunters for the Hungry participant. Photo by Katherine Taylor, USFWS.

    Hunting for a cause

    December 12, 2018 | 3 minute read

    For many Americans hunting is a vehicle for connecting with nature and the great outdoors. Just look at the numbers: a five-year report found that 101.6 million Americans participated in hunting, fishing and wildlife activities in 2016.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A tiny greenish brown fish in front of a white ruler.
    Information icon Spring pygmy sunfish. Photo by Matt Laschet, USFWS.

    Spring pygmy sunfish designation of critical habitat

    May 29, 2019 | 5 minute read

    What is the spring pygmy sunfish and where does it occur? The spring pygmy sunfish is a spring-associated fish which is currently found in spring systems in the Tennessee River drainage in northern Alabama. Understanding of the distribution of the spring pygmy sunfish changed in 2015 with the discovery of the fish in Blackwell Swamp on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge. Currently the spring pygmy sunfish is known from Beaverdam Spring/Creek in Limestone County and Blackwell Swamp in Madison County.  Learn more...

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Final listing of the trispot darter, proposed 4(d) rule, proposed critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule and critical habitat. Check out the press release for this decision. What does it mean when a species is threatened?  Learn more...

News

  • A biologist dressed for cold weather holds an acient-looking fish on a boat at sea
    Information icon Biologist Albert Spells with Atlantic sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status review of Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies)

    April 11, 2019 | 2 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries will jointly conduct a five-year status review of the Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies). This fish, federally listed as threatened, is found along the coasts and in the rivers of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning the Atlantic sturgeon on or before June 10, 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A close-up shot of a small fish with a black line along it’s side and a bright red tip on it’s dorsal fin.
    Information icon Ashy darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Thanks to conservation partnerships, two southeastern fish and a snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

    April 3, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Following extensive scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that three southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the ashy darter, Barrens darter and Arkansas mudalia snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. For each animal, the Service brought together a team of biologists who compiled and examined all known data and research. Their peer-reviewed findings are outlined in species status assessments (SSAs), made available today.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Unique fish gets endangered species protection with proposed exemptions and critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 6 minute read

    A small, colorful fish found in the Coosa River Basin is now federally protected. On January 29, 2018, the trispot darter was formally recognized as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing exemptions to otherwise prohibited activities under the ESA. The exemptions, included in a 4(d) rule, mark the ESA’s flexibility in allowing for certain management activities to continue because of their overall benefit to the long-term status of the listed darter.  Read the full story...

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