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Tag: Alabama

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alabama.”

Articles

  • A flock of geese flying over a pond full of white swans
    Information icon Wildlife management areas, such as North Carolina's Texas Plantation, have benefited from a decades-old federal funding plan. The state acquired the 1,467-acre tract with $1.38 million in federal restoration funds. It matched that amount with $462,500 from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses. Photo by NCWRC.

    Money well-spent

    July 8, 2020 | 6 minute read

    The evidence is there, in long rows of numbers and words that detail where the land was purchased, and when, and — most important — how much. But numbers and words don’t explain how a lake sparkles beneath a rising sun. They cannot convey the scent of pine needles, the rapid-fire hammering of a woodpecker. The sums cannot add to the thrill of seeing a mama bear and her cubs stick inquisitive noses into a forest clearing.  Learn more...

  • A lone pine tree stands tall on a narrow peninsula along a bay
    Information icon Weeks Bay marsh, Alabama. Photo by Weeks Bay NERR.

    Gateway to Weeks Bay conserved for future generations

    June 2, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Whether gliding through the mouth of Weeks Bay by motor or paddle craft, the first strip of land that catches a voyager’s eye is the East Gateway Tract. The tract is roughly 175 acres of critically important and diverse land that includes micro-dune habitat, tidal streams, marshland, and forested wetlands. The water surrounding East Gateway is a prime fishing location with a prevalence of redfish and speckled trout, which is not to be outdone by the bird watching opportunities on the tract, as it provides wonderful habitat for migratory birds.  Learn more...

  • Two long-necked grey birds with red markings on their heads near a small pond
    Information icon A pair of Mississippi sandhill cranes forage in a private pasture that is permanently protected as crane habitat by an NRCS Agricultural Land Easement. Photo by Jason Keenan, NRCS.

    Service’s Coastal Program Helps Recover Mississippi Sandhill Crane

    May 22, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Mississippi has several rare birds, but one of the rarest is the Mississippi sandhill crane, with only about 125 individuals left in the wild. This non-migratory subspecies of the sandhill crane once lived in coastal Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and western Florida, but the only place they currently exist in the wild is in and around the 19,000-acre Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge in Jackson County, Mississippi. The refuge was established in 1975 to help prevent these striking birds from becoming extinct, and it was the very first national wildlife refuge established specifically for an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • Mobile Bay plans will help conserve Alabama coastal ecosystems

    May 5, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been working with the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program (MBNEP), in partnership with the state of Alabama, to secure funding through the RESTORE Act (Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s (NFWF) Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund to develop plans for watersheds along the Alabama coast. Map of intertidal 12-digit HUC watersheds for which watershed management plans have been completed or are planned, from - RESPECT THE CONNECT: An Updated Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for Alabama’s Estuaries and Coast 2019-2023.  Learn more...

  • A tiny beige fish with three vertical stripes along its back
    Information icon An adult trispot darter measures less than two inches; the measure shown here is in centimeters. Photo by USFWS.

    For the love of a darter: partners promote a fishy courtship

    April 22, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Nestled in the rolling hills of St. Clair County, Alabama, is a small, unassuming stream that is getting a lot of attention these days. This intermittent stream is a small tributary to Little Canoe Creek which appears to be no different than many others in the area. In fact, it doesn’t even have flowing water during most of the year. However, this one is special, at least from a conservation standpoint.  Learn more...

  • A FWS biologist on the shoreline of a river
    Information icon Dave Helon, forest ecologist at Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Hunt Alabama. And Mississippi. And the rest of the country.

    March 19, 2020 | 8 minute read

    Grand Bay, Alabama — Head west on U.S. 90 from this old Gulf Coast farming town, turn left onto Pecan Road and then follow Bayou Heron Road through the Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge to one of Alabama’s best spots to go duck hunting. In Mississippi. Because you can’t easily reach one of the finest redhead-hunting sites in Alabama without first crossing the border into the Magnolia State. But that doesn’t keep dozens of Alabama duck hunters from hauling their Jon boats to the 10,200-acre, bi-state refuge each morning before the sun crests Grand Bay.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Information icon Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Black pinesnake final Critical Habitat designation

    February 25, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing designation of critical habitat for the black pinesnake, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the black pinesnake and where is it found? The black pinesnake is a large, nonvenomous snake, one of three subspecies of pinesnakes in the southeastern United States. These snakes are typically all black and may reach up to six feet in length.  Learn more...

News

  • An older man points to the sky with a child.
    Information icon Hunting. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes more opportunities to hunt, fish across South Atlantic, Gulf and Mississippi Basin

    April 27, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to expand hunting and fishing opportunities on another 500,000 acres of national wildlife refuge lands across the South. If approved, the new regulations will take effect this fall. In all, 22 refuges will offer more than 110 new or expanded hunting and fishing opportunities — new species to hunt, more acres to hunt and more times to hunt. “We continue to build upon our recent successes to expand our recreational offerings,” said Leo Miranda, an avid hunter and regional director for the South Atlantic-Gulf & Mississippi Basin.  Read the full story...

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Information icon Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalizes Critical Habitat for threatened black pinesnake

    February 25, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Daphne, Alabama — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for the black pinesnake, a non-venomous constrictor found only in Mississippi and Alabama. This native reptile was listed as threatened under the ESA in 2015 following population declines due to habitat loss and degradation. The black pinesnake is native to longleaf pine forests, one of the world’s most ecologically diverse natural places and one that is in peril.  Read the full story...

  • A small, beige minnow-like fish with a dark stripe down its side
    Information icon Ozark chub. Photo by Dustin Lynch, Arkansas Natural Heritage Comission.

    Improved science and conservation partnerships mean a Southeastern fish and flowering plant do not need Endangered Species Act protections

    December 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Based on an extensive review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the Ozark chub and the purpledisk honeycombhead do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Protection of these species on conservation lands and new survey data helped inform the Service’s decisions not to list these species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). These not warranted findings are due in part to ESA-inspired partnerships between local, state and federal stakeholders, who collaborated to protect and conserve these species before they required federal protections.  Read the full story...

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