skip to content

Tag: Alabama Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alabama Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A tiny loggerhead hatchling hustles towards the ocean.

    Moonlighting in Alabama

    November 6, 2017 | 5 minute readLisa was keeping a watchful eye on a sea turtle nest, which laid beneath the sand. A Share the Beach volunteer for more than 16 years, Graham knew the routine: a female sea turtle nested in that spot two months ago, which meant the eggs could hatch at any time. Learn more...

    Loggerhead hatchling meets ocean. Photo by Becky Skiba, USFWS.

Faq

  • A crayfish with brown and white splotches and narrow claws with deep red tips

    Slenderclaw crayfish listing proposal, 4(d) Rule, Critical Habitat

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute readWhat action is being proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? As a result of the completion of a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding, the Service is proposing to list the slenderclaw crayfish as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) with a 4(d) rule and designate critical habitat. An SSA is an in-depth review of the species’ biology and threats, an evaluation of its biological status, and an assessment of the resources and conditions needed to maintain long-term viability. Learn more...

    Slenderclaw crayfish (Cambarus cracens). Photo © Guenter Schuster.

News

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute readService officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Read the full story...

  • A small, brown and yellow fish with iridescent scales around its gills

    New population of spring pygmy sunfish discovered

    November 2, 2018 | 3 minute readTo protect one of only two known populations of a rare, threatened Alabama fish, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proposing to designate a swamp in Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) as critical habitat for the species. A new population of spring pygmy sunfish was discovered in the swamp in late 2015. The proposed critical habitat designation will help guard against the sunfish’s extinction and support recovery efforts by local, state and federal partners. Read the full story...

    A female spring pygmy sunfish. Photo by Matt Laschet.

  • A crayfish with brown and white splotches and narrow claws with deep red tips

    Service proposes to list rare freshwater crayfish, designate Critical Habitat

    October 5, 2018 | 4 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list the slenderclaw crayfish as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). At the same time, it also is proposing to designate critical habitat and a 4(d) rule describing management activities that would continue to be permitted because of the benefit to the crayfish and landowners. With two known populations, the slenderclaw crayfish is disappearing throughout its range. Historically, the crayfish was known to live in four small streams or tributaries within the Short Creek and Town Creek watersheds, both in the Tennessee River Basin in Dekalb and Marshall counties, Alabama. Read the full story...

    Slenderclaw crayfish (Cambarus cracens). Photo © Guenter Schuster.

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

    Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute readAs part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

    Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

  • A light purple salamander with dark spots and tufts above its front legs.

    Alabama “mudpuppy” to receive federal protection

    January 2, 2018 | 3 minute readThe Black Warrior waterdog, a large aquatic salamander found only in the Black Warrior River Basin in Alabama, is now a federally protected species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) listed the salamander as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), meaning it is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A rigorous review of the best available science has found low and declining population numbers due to loss and fragmentation of its habitat and poor water quality in the Black Warrior River Basin. Read the full story...

    Black Warrior waterdog. Photo by Joseph Jenkins, Alabama Natural Heritage Program.

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute readMore research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding. Read the full story...

    Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

  • A turtle basking on a log overhanging a pool of water.

    Endangered species listing not needed for three species of wildlife in the Southeast

    October 4, 2017 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded the Barbour’s map turtle, the Florida Keys mole skink, and the Big Blue Springs cave crayfish do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future and do not require Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections. Based on a rigorous review of the science, the Service has determined that all three species have healthy and stable populations, primary stressors do not threaten their survival in the wild, and adequate conservation measures are in place for each. Read the full story...

    Adult female Barbour’s map turtle on the Chipola River. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn