skip to content

Tag: Alabama Beach Mouse

The content below has been tagged with the term “Alabama Beach Mouse.”

Articles

  • A man and a woman drag discarded Christmas trees across the sand on a beach
    Information icon Alabama Field Office biologists Eric Spagenske and Erin Padgett drag Christmas trees through a stretch of beach in Fort Morgan, Alabama. Photo by Denise Rowell, USFWS.

    Service works with Alabama landowner to turn trees into sand dunes on the Gulf Coast

    July 24, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Fort Morgan, Alabama — Biologist Bill Lynn’s eyes widened as he saw the massive pile of Christmas trees before him. Lynn, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Alabama Field Office, was collecting leftover trees from businesses in Baldwin County. “If I had known the trees were this big, I would have grabbed more volunteers,” laughed Lynn. Alabama Field Office biologists Erin Padgett and Bill Lynn pick up Christmas trees from a local business in Fort Morgan, Alabama.  Learn more...

  • A marsh at low tide exposes a mud flat with sparse pine trees in the distance.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Coastal Alabama refuge adds land

    April 26, 2019 | 3 minute read

    A jewel of an ecosystem just grew by more than 350 football fields, thanks to a partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and several partners. The land in question: the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, a roughly 7,000-acre tract near Gulf Shores, Alabama. It’s called the Little Point Clear Unit — two parcels comprising 470 acres, enough land to accommodate 355 football games. It became a formal part of the refuge April 26.  Learn more...

  • two yellow flowers growing out of very sandy soil.
    Information icon Ground chokecherry. Photo by USFWS.

    Sowing plants to reap dunes

    February 28, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Restoration biologist Kate Healy felt the sun on her face as she stood on a sandy stretch of beach along Alabama’s Gulf coast. It was an unseasonably warm day on Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, and Healy, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf Restoration Office in Fairhope, Alabama, was ready to get to work. Kate Healy and Jackie Sablan plant ground chokecherry at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn