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Tag: 90-Day Finding

The content below has been tagged with the term “90-Day Finding.”

Endangered-Species-Act

  • A brown salamander with bright white spots walks across a lichen covered rock
    A petition to list the Caddo Mountain salamander was found to be “not substantial” in June 2015. Photo by Aposematic herpetologist, CC-BY-NC 2.0.

    90-Day Petition Findings

    A 90-day finding is a formal evaluation of a claim made within a petition under the Endangered Species Act that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service consider modifications to the existing federal laws to protect a species. It does not list a species as protected.  Learn more...

  • A close up photo of a semi translucent gray-silver crayfish walking on rocky substrate.
    Angular dwarf crayfish. Photo by Chris Lukhaup, USDA Forest Service.

    Endangered Species Act Protection Not Needed for Four Southeastern Animals

    September 20, 2016 | 5 minute read

    The Endangered Species Act allows anyone to request, or petition, the Service to add a plant or animal to the federal endangered species list. The Service was petitioned to place all four of these animals on the list, and all but the crayfish have been considered candidates for the threatened and endangered species list. The Service is in the midst of a multi-year work plan to address these species, and evaluating these animals is part of the scheduled 2016 workload.  Learn more...

  • Petition review of seven skinks found in the southeast

    January 15, 2016 | 4 minute read

    Any plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.” Recognizing that conservation is only successful through partnerships, the Service leveraged the work of state wildlife agencies and a variety of other conservation partners to assess whether these species at-risk require protection under the Act. Since receipt of the 2010 petitions, 42 species do not need federal protection as a result of either conservation actions, additional information (e.  Learn more...

  • A yellow and black bumble bee perched on a white flower.
    Information icon Rusty-patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis). Photo by Dan Mullen, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Additional information on six petitioned species including two snakes, two bees, a butterfly and a snail found in the Southeast

    September 17, 2015 | 5 minute read

    Any plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.” When we are petitioned to provide federal protection to a species, our biologists review the information presented by the petitioner as well as the information in our files prior to the date of the petition to determine whether a closer look at the species’ status is advisable.  Learn more...

  • A brownish-yellow salamander sanding on a mossy rock with large round eyes.
    Information icon The Pigeon Mountain salamander is no longer at-risk of needing federal protection. Photo by John P. Clare, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Additional information on petitioned turtles, salamanders, snakes, a skink and a crayfish found in the Southeast

    June 25, 2015 | 9 minute read

    Any plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.” When we are petitioned to provide federal protection to a species, our biologists review the information presented by the petitioner as well as the information in our files prior to the date of the petition to determine whether a closer look at the species’ status is advisable.  Learn more...

  • A close up photo of a gray-silver salamander walking on a layer of wet moss.
    Cheoah bald salamander. Photo by Andy Kraemer, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Additional information on six petitioned species including three salamanders, one lizard, and two insects found in the Southeast

    March 15, 2015 | 5 minute read

    Any plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.” Recognizing that conservation is only successful through partnerships, the Service leveraged the work of state wildlife agencies and a variety of other conservation partners to assess whether these species at-risk require protection under the Act. Since receipt of the 2010 petitions, 60 southeastern species have not required federal protection as a result of either conservation actions, additional information (e.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A black bear in an open pine habitat.
    A black bear in the woods. Photo by FWC.

    Florida black bear 90-day not substantial finding

    April 18, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Who petitioned the Service? On March 18, 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) received a petition dated March 17, 2016, from Center for Biological Diversity, Animal Legal Defense Fund, Animal Hero Kids, Animal Rights Foundation of Florida, Animal Welfare Institute, Big Cat Rescue, Guillaume Chapron, CompassionWorks International, Environmental Action, The Humane Society of the United States, Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary, Miha Krofel, The League of Women Voters of Florida, Lobby for Animals, Paul C.  Learn more...

News

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.
    Information icon Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com, used with permission.

    Black-capped petrel may warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act

    June 20, 2012 | 5 minute read

    A nocturnal seabird, the black-capped petrel, may warrant federal protection as a threatened or endangered species. Endangered means the species is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range; threatened means the species is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. The black-capped petrel is found in North America and the Caribbean, and is known by several common names: “black-capped petrel,” “capped petrel,” and “West Indian petrel” in North America and on English-speaking islands.  Read the full story...

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