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Tag: 4d Rule

The content below has been tagged with the term “4d Rule.”

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  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Proposed Endangered Species Act findings for the Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog

    May 21, 2019 | 18 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is proposing to list the Carolina madtom as an endangered species throughout its range and the Neuse River waterdog as a threatened species throughout its range with a 4(d) rule. We are also proposing designation of critical habitat for both species and releasing a draft economic analysis. What is the difference between threatened and endangered species? Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), an endangered species is currently in danger of becoming extinct throughout all or a significant portion of its range, while a threatened species is likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future.  Learn more...

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    American burying beetle Endangered Species Act downlisting proposal and 4(d) rule

    May 1, 2019 | 13 minute read

    What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing? The Service is proposing to downlist the American burying beetle from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This proposal is based on a thorough review of the best available science and information, including the recently completed Species Status Assessment (SSA), indicating the beetle is not presently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Final listing of the trispot darter, proposed 4(d) rule, proposed critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule and critical habitat. Check out the press release for this decision. What does it mean when a species is threatened?  Learn more...

News

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog proposed for Endangered Species Act protection

    May 21, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The venom in the stinging spines of the Carolina madtom’s fins is so potent that it earned the freshwater catfish the scientific name, Noturus furiosus. The Neuse River waterdog salamander, with its black spots and red external gills, looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Both species are part of North Carolina’s rich biological heritage, and due to ongoing threats are now only found in limited and shrinking areas of the state.  Read the full story...

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Conservation partnerships lead to proposed downlisting of American burying beetle

    May 1, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The American burying beetle, one of nature’s most unique creatures, appears to be more plentiful, thanks in part to the efforts of a wide array of partners across its range. Following the beetle’s listing in 1989 as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and stakeholders implemented conservation and recovery efforts, and now the Service is proposing to downlist it from endangered to threatened.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Unique fish gets endangered species protection with proposed exemptions and critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 6 minute read

    A small, colorful fish found in the Coosa River Basin is now federally protected. On January 29, 2018, the trispot darter was formally recognized as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing exemptions to otherwise prohibited activities under the ESA. The exemptions, included in a 4(d) rule, mark the ESA’s flexibility in allowing for certain management activities to continue because of their overall benefit to the long-term status of the listed darter.  Read the full story...

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    Service proposes special rule to focus protections for northern long-eared bat

    January 15, 2015 | 6 minute read

    In response to the rapid and severe decline of the northern long-eared bat – a species important for crop pest control – the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing a special rule under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) that would provide the maximum benefit to the species while limiting the regulatory burden on the public. If finalized, the rule, under section 4(d) of the ESA, would apply only in the event the Service lists the bat as “threatened.  Read the full story...

  • Coiled up black pinesnake on grass.
    Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Service proposes to list the black pinesnake as threatened

    October 6, 2014 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list the black pinesnake as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) with a proposed section 4(d) rule. If finalized, this 4(d) rule would exempt certain activities from the take prohibitions of the ESA that would positively affect black pinesnake populations and provide an overall conservation benefit to the snake. These activities include herbicide treatments, prescribed burning, restoration along river banks and stream buffers, and some intermediate timber treatments.  Read the full story...

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