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Tag: 4d Rule

The content below has been tagged with the term “4d Rule.”

Faq

  • A small fish with tan and brown markings blending into the pebble substrate.
    Information icon Frecklebelly madtom. Photo by USFWS.

    Frecklebelly madtom proposed listing, 4(d) rule and critical habitat frequently asked questions

    November 17, 2020 | 7 minute read

    What is the frecklebelly madtom and where does it occur? The frecklebelly madtom is a small, stout catfish that inhabits the main channels and tributaries of medium to large river systems in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. The fish has a broad but scattered distribution across the Pearl River and Mobile Basin drainages. Throughout its range, the frecklebelly madtom primarily occupies streams and rivers within the Gulf Coastal Plain province.  Learn more...

  • A small fish with swimming above rocky substrate. Fish is striped tail to snout brown, black and white.
    Information icon Sickle darter; Photo by Crystal Ruble, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Proposed listing for the sickle darter and proposed 4(d) rule

    November 10, 2020 | 5 minute read

    What is the sickle darter? The sickle darter is a small, bottom-dwelling fish native to the upper Tennessee River drainage in North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Sickle darters are typically found in slow flowing pools of larger, upland creeks and small to medium rivers. Where does the sickle darter occur? Historically (prior to 2005), the sickle darter was known to be found in nine tributary systems of the upper Tennessee River drainage in the following rivers in North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia: Emory, Clinch, Powell, Little, French Broad, North Fork Holston, Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston and Watauga.  Learn more...

  • An orange, black and cream colored butterfly perched on a yellow flowering plant
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly. Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    Proposed threatened listing under the Endangered Species Act for the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly, along with proposed Critical Habitat and 4(d) Rule

    October 9, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What is the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly and where does it occur? The Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly is a medium-sized butterfly in the checkerspot family that is native to Puerto Rico. The butterfly’s distribution is fragmented among remnants of native forest in northwestern and southwestern Puerto Rico. What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available scientific and commercial information, the U.  Learn more...

  • An orange, black and cream colored butterfly perched on a yellow flowering plant
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly. Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    Propuesta para listar como amenazada la Mariposa Arlequín de Puerto Rico bajo la Ley de Especies en Peligro de Extinción junto con la designación de Hábitat Crítico propuesto y la Regla 4 (d)

    October 9, 2020 | 7 minute read

    ¿Qué es la mariposa arlequín puertorriqueña y dónde ocurre? La mariposa arlequín de Puerto Rico es una mariposa de tamaño mediano de la familia de las mariposas con manchas de ajedrez que es endémica de Puerto Rico. La distribución de la mariposa está fragmentada entre los remanentes de bosque nativo en el noroeste y suroeste de Puerto Rico. ¿Qué acción está tomando el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre?  Learn more...

  • A blackish/navy blue bird with bright red eyes and white markings on its wings
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo by Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Eastern black rail - final 4(d) rule

    October 7, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species. The ESA provides a specific list of prohibitions for endangered species under section 9, but does not automatically provide these same prohibitions to threatened species. Section 4(d) of the ESA allows the Service to establish prohibitions or exceptions to prohibitions for threatened species. The intent of any 4(d) rule is to provide for the conservation of a threatened species by allowing regulatory flexibility under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail final listing as a threatened species

    October 7, 2020 | 14 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing a rule to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  Learn more...

News

  • Summary of the Neuse River waterdog final 4(d) rule- prohibitions and exceptions.

    June 17, 2021 | 5 minute read

    The Service is announcing a final rule that identifies Endangered Species Act protections for the Neuse River waterdog. The final 4(d) rule, published in the Federal Register on June 9, 2021; and will go into effect on July 30, 2021, which is 30 days after it publishes in the Federal Register. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with tan and brown markings blending into the pebble substrate.
    Information icon Frecklebelly madtom. Photo by USFWS.

    Service proposes to list population of frecklebelly madtom as threatened under Endangered Species Act

    November 17, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Following a review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list a population of the frecklebelly madtom in the Upper Coosa River in Georgia and Tennessee as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The proposal, which would provide protections to this distinct population segment (DPS), also includes proposing critical habitat and a 4(d) rule for this population. The frecklebelly madtom is a small catfish that inhabits channels and tributaries of medium to large river systems in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee.  Read the full story...

  • An orange, black and cream colored butterfly perched on a yellow flowering plant
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly. Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    El Servicio solicita comentarios del público sobre la propuesta para incluir la Mariposa Arlequín de Puerto Rico como especie amenazada bajo la Ley Federal de Especies en Peligro de Extinción

    October 9, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Hoy, el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (el Servicio) propone incluir la Mariposa Arlequín de Puerto Rico (Atlantea tulita) como especie amenazada bajo la Ley Federal de Especies en Peligro de Extinción (ESA, por sus siglas en inglés). El Servicio también propone designar hábitat crítico para la mariposa, así como un reglamento especial 4 (d). El Servicio aceptará comentarios públicos sobre esta propuesta hasta el 14 de diciembre de 2020 (60 días después de su publicación en el Registro Federal).  Read the full story...

  • An orange, black and cream colored butterfly perched on a yellow flowering plant
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly. Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    Service seeks public comment on proposal to list rare Puerto Rican butterfly as threatened under Endangered Species Act

    October 9, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list the Harlequin butterfly as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing to designate critical habitat for the butterfly, as well as a special 4(d) rule. The Service will accept public comments on this proposed decision until 12/14/2020 (60 days after publication in FR). Six populations of the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly, a medium-sized butterfly native to Puerto Rico, are known to exist in the world.  Read the full story...

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