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  • A severely low river due to drought
    The drought results in very low water levels in the Nantahala River. Photo by Dana Lane, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Bringing water conservation into the home for winter

    September 8, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll take a look at how homeowners can curb water consumption, lower water bills, and help protect water supplies that people and animals rely on in the face of continued drought. In college I spent a summer working on a Montana dude ranch where I spent my fair share of evenings sipping Rainier beer in the ranch’s laundry room which doubled as a staff loitering area.  Learn more...

  • A river overruns its banks
    A flooding river. Photo by Jay Joslin, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    New floodplain maps unveiled for Western North Carolina

    September 2, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll take a look at the new floodplain maps and what this means to wildlife. A slow moment often finds me looking at area real estate listings – perhaps hoping to find the perfect old farm. I never find that real estate gem, but I recently came across a beautiful home sitting almost on top of a beautiful mountain stream.  Learn more...

  • Children inspect insects from the creek with a magnifying glass.
    Taking a closer look at stream insects. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Kids in the creek gets 8th graders’ feet wet

    July 27, 2008 | 2 minute read

    Transcript It’s not very often 8th graders get to see their teacher kiss a fish, however, students from North Carolina’s Waynesville Middle School got to see language arts teach Phyllis Kapsalis pucker up and smack one on a northern hogsucker during a recent trip to the Pigeon River. Haywood County’s Kids in the Creek program gets every public school 8th grader in the county out of the classroom and into the Pigeon River to learn about streams and water quality.  Learn more...

  • A dozen children check out small insects that were collected in the river.
    Students gathered around the macroinvertebrate table. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Connecting people with nature

    June 27, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As we enter summer, this week we’ll look at a growing movement to get kids outside. We’re blessed on our street with fourteen kids between 2 and 18, turning our residential street into an extension of everyone’s living room. This year’s crop of 17-year cicadas had everyone excited for a couple of weeks. Kids walked up and down the street, filling plastic containers with the abandoned shells of juvenile insects.  Learn more...

  • A microscopic algae shown under a microscope.
    Information icon Didymosphenia geminata under a microscope. MUSE [CC BY-SA 3.0](https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia Commons.

    Didymo - what does the spread of this northern algae mean for Southern Appalachian streams?

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at algae that’s becoming the scourge of western trout anglers and is knocking on the door of the Southern Appalachians. Unless you’re an angler or a biologist, you may not even know what a mayfly is. It’s a harmless insect that spends most of its life living in water. Anglers know the mayfly because it’s an important fish food and therefore the inspiration of numerous lures.  Learn more...

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