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  • Three goats go to work eating overgrown vegetation.
    Goats grazing. Photo by Courtney Celley, USFWS.

    Goats aid in the conservation of one of the Southern Appalachians most important areas

    October 26, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at a curious project to protect one of the Southern Appalachians’ most important natural areas. No mountain in the Southern Appalachians goes above tree-line – the elevation above which conditions become inhospitable for trees, yet we have mountains without trees on their peaks. Instead of forest, these peaks are covered with grassy fields, known as balds, offering some of the most spectacular views in the region.  Learn more...

  • Dam removal in the Toe River Valley

    October 19, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’re going to look at steps being taken to help restore the health of a pair of Western North Carolina rivers. The North Toe River flows through the town of Spruce Pine, in North Carolina’s Mitchell County. In town, the river is bordered by riverside park – a city park, with picnic tables and swings, where one can sit and enjoy the river flowing by.  Learn more...

  • A shiny green insect burrowed into a tree.
    Emerald ashe borer. Photo by USDA.

    Protecting the Southern Appalachians from the emerald ash borer

    October 12, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week we’ll look at ash trees and what’s casting a shadow over their future. Soon temperatures will warm and Southern Appalachia’s minor-league baseball stadiums will come to life. Baseball is a relatively slow-moving game, and it’s the crack of the bat that brings pause to conversations and lingering eyes back to the field. Focused on the action, few people ever give much thought to the bat.  Learn more...

  • A small bat with white powder around its nose covered in tiny water droplets.
    Little brown bat with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Jonathan Mays, ME Dept. of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

    White nose syndrome strikes bats in the Northeast

    October 5, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at a mysterious condition killing thousands of bats in the Northeast that biologists hope to keep from spreading to the Southern Appalachians. Last winter, biologists found several thousand dead bats in caves around Albany, New York. A majority of the dead bats had a white fungal growth on their noses, giving the condition the name white nose syndrome.  Learn more...

  • Freshwater jellyfish in the Southern Appalachians

    September 28, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature. This week we’ll look at freshwater jellyfish in the Southern Appalachians. Though it’s been six months since she was stung, our two-year old daughter identifies any image of a jellyfish as an “ouchee” and is quick to point out where she was stung on her leg. It wouldn’t please her to learn jellyfish are floating around lakes a short drive from our home.  Learn more...

  • A biologist takes notes in a notebook under an overcast sky.
    Sue Cameron takes notes near Jackson Park. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Saving, and improving, a Hendersonville wetland

    September 22, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. With all the attention given to development impacts in the mountains, this morning we’re going to look at how a development in Hendersonville, North Carolina will actually improve the situation for wildlife and bird watchers. There aren’t a lot of wetlands in the mountains. Our topography generally dictates that water quickly flows downhill to flatter lands, instead of pooling up and creating wetlands.  Learn more...

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Planning for growth in Haywood County

    September 15, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week we’ll look at a place where residents have spoken up about the kind of community they want to have, and what that means for the future of wildlife there. If you look at the headlines of local papers across the Southern Appalachians, one of the common themes is communities wrestling with blossoming development - wrangling over subdivision ordinances, stormwater control ordinances, new roads, approving new developments, not approving new developments.  Learn more...

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