skip to content

News

Subscribe to an RSS feed

  • Ducks with green heads in a flooded agriculture field feeding on corn with thousands more ducks flying overhead.
    Information icon Mallards fueling for their migration in a cooperative agriculture field. Photo by USFWS.

    Comment period for use of genetically engineered crops on National Wildlife Refuges extended

    April 1, 2020 | 1 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has extended until April 19, 2020, the period of time in which the public can comment on the proposed use of genetically engineered crops (GECs) on Southeastern National Wildlife Refuges. The public is welcome to comment on the proposal, which the Service has prepared as a draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA). Comments and questions must be submitted in writing to fw4_gmcpea@fws.gov or mailed to Pamala Wingrove, Branch Chief of Planning, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.  Read the full story...

  • Ducks with green heads in a flooded agriculture field feeding on corn with thousands more ducks flying overhead.
    Information icon Mallards fueling for their migration in a cooperative agriculture field. Photo by USFWS.

    Public input requested on environmental assessment for genetically engineered crops on national wildlife refuges in the Southeastern United States

    March 19, 2020 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has prepared a draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) for the potential use of genetically engineered crops (GECs) on national wildlife refuges in the southeastern United States. The National Wildlife Refuge System, the public lands network managed by the Service, employs a number of wildlife management practices to deliver specific conservation objectives on each of the nation’s 568 national wildlife refuges. The use of GECs by farmers on refuges in the Southeast Region can help refuge managers meet the purposes of the refuge and provide wildlife forage for birds and other wildlife.  Read the full story...

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Partners celebrate recovery of tiny orchid in Puerto Rico

    March 9, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Thanks to a successful conservation partnership involving the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, a tiny orchid, Lepanthes eltoroensis, is being proposed for delisting from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Plants. The orchid is restricted to one general area within El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico at elevations above 2,461 feet. However, the orchid’s estimated population has increased from around 140 individuals, when it was listed as an endangered species in 1991, to a current estimate of about 3,000 individuals.  Read the full story...

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Se celebra la recuperación de una pequeña orquídea en Puerto Rico

    March 9, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Gracias a la exitosa colaboración de conservación entre el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre, El Servicio Forestal Federal y el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico, se ha propuesto remover a Lepanthes eltoroensis, una pequeña orquídea, de la lista federal de especies amenazadas y en peligro de extinción. Esta orquídea está restringida a un área específica en elevaciones sobre los 2,461 pies dentro del Bosque Nacional El Yunque.  Read the full story...

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Information icon Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    Service finalizes 4(d) rule to aid conservation of Louisiana pinesnake and support landowner efforts

    February 26, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a special 4(d) rule for the Louisiana pinesnake, tailoring conservation protections for the snake while ensuring greater regulatory certainty for landowners. The Louisiana pinesnake was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2018 and landowners play a critical role in its conservation and recovery. “Conservation agencies, non-profit groups and the timber industry are all taking steps to reverse the decline of the Louisiana pinesnake and its habitat,” said Leopoldo Miranda, Service regional director for the South Atlantic Gulf and Mississippi Basin.  Read the full story...

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Information icon Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalizes Critical Habitat for threatened black pinesnake

    February 25, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Daphne, Alabama — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for the black pinesnake, a non-venomous constrictor found only in Mississippi and Alabama. This native reptile was listed as threatened under the ESA in 2015 following population declines due to habitat loss and degradation. The black pinesnake is native to longleaf pine forests, one of the world’s most ecologically diverse natural places and one that is in peril.  Read the full story...

  • A leafy green vine like plant growing on a rock face.
    Information icon Florida bristle fern. Photo by Keith Bradley.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes Critical Habitat for the endangered Florida bristle fern

    February 21, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed to designate critical habitat for the rare Florida bristle fern under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service listed the Florida bristle fern, a plant found only in Miami-Dade and Sumter counties in Florida, as endangered in 2015. The Service also announced availability of a draft economic analysis on the proposed critical habitat designation. The public is invited to submit comments on the, critical habitat designation and draft economic analysis during a 60-day comment period ending April 24, 2020.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn