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Puerto Rican boa. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra.

Service announces recovery plan revisions for 43 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

Additions part of comprehensive effort to ensure all Endangered Species Act recovery plans contain quantifiable recovery goals

As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 21 recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 43 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. The effort calls for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery by September 2019.

Recovery plans are non-regulatory guidance documents that identify, organize and prioritize recovery actions, set measurable recovery objectives, and include time and cost estimates. In total, the Service will revise up to 182 recovery plans covering some 305 species listed under the ESA.

The Service’s success in preventing extinctions and recovering species is due to ESA-inspired partnerships with diverse stakeholders, such as state, federal, and tribal wildlife agencies, industry, conservation groups and citizens. Each species for which recovery criteria are being revised in this effort has undergone or is currently undergoing a status review that considers the best scientific and commercial data that have become available since the species’ listing or most recent status review. This information includes:

  1. the biology of the species,
  2. habitat conditions,
  3. conservation measures that have benefitted the species,
  4. threat status and trends in relation to the five listing factors, and
  5. other information, data, or corrections.

As such, these revisions reflect scientific and informational updates, which have been gained from years of collaborative work with our partners. Revisions benefit endangered and threatened species, our partners, and the public by sharing the best available information about what is really needed to achieve recovery.

Under guidance established in 2010, partial revisions, such as amendments, allow the Service to efficiently and effectively update recovery plans with the latest science and information when a recovery plan may not warrant the time or resources required to undertake a full revision of the plan. (This batch includes both amendments and full recovery plan revisions, as noted in below table.)

The document appears today in the Federal Register Reading Room. There will be a 30-day comment period on the proposed revisions, ending on September 5, 2019.

We are requesting submission of any information that enhances understanding of the:

  1. species’ biology and threats, and the
  2. recovery needs and related implementation issues or concerns. We seek to ensure that we have assembled, considered and incorporated the best available scientific and commercial information into the draft recovery plan revisions for these 43 species.

The plan revisions cover the following species:

Table 1. List of Southeastern animals in batch

Common Name Current Range Recovery Plan
Southern combshell AL, MS Five Tombigbee River Mussels Recovery Plan
Black clubshell AL, MS Five Tombigbee River Mussels Recovery Plan
Fat pocketbook AR, IL, IN, KY, LA, MO, MS, TN A Recovery Plan for the Fat Pocketbook Pearly Mussel Potamilus capax
Alabama redbellied turtle AL, MS Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Alabama Red-Bellied Turtle (Pseudemys alabamensis)
Dusky gopher frog AL, MS Dusky Gopher Frog (Rana sevosa) Recovery Plan
Alabama cavefish AL Alabama Cavefish Speoplatyrhinus poulsoni Recovery Plan (Second Revision)
Alabama beach mouse AL Recovery Plan for the Alabama Beach Mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates), Perdido Key Beach Mouse (P. p. trissyllepsis), and Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse (P. p. allophrys)
Choctawhatchee beach mouse FL Recovery Plan for the Alabama Beach Mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates), Perdido Key Beach Mouse (P. p. trissyllepsis), and Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse (P. p. allophrys)
Perdido Key beach mouse AL, FL Recovery Plan for the Alabama Beach Mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates), Perdido Key Beach Mouse (P. p. trissyllepsis), and Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse (P. p. allophrys)
Ochlockonee moccasinshell FL, GA Recovery Plan for Endangered Fat Threeridge, Shinyrayed Pocketbook, Gulf Moccasinshell, Oval Pigtoe and Threatened Chipola Slabshell, and Purple bankclimber
Florida scrub-jay FL Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens)
American crocodile FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Snail kite FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Eastern indigo snake AL, FL, GA Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Eastern Indigo Snake
Amber darter GA, TN Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Amber Darter (Percina antesella)
Conasauga logperch GA, TN Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Conasauga Logperch (Percina jenkinsi)
Louisiana pearlshell AR, LA Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Louisiana Pearlshell (Margaritifera hembeli)
Puerto Rican sharp-shinned hawk Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Broad-Winged Hawk and Puerto Rican Sharp-Shinned Hawk Recovery Plan
Puerto Rican broad-winged hawk Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Broad-Winged Hawk and Puerto Rican Sharp-Shinned Hawk Recovery Plan
Puerto Rican boa Puerto Rico Recovery Plan for the Puerto Rican Boa
Virgin Islands tree boa Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands Recovery Plan for the Virgin Islands Tree Boa (Epicrates monensis granti)

Table 2. List of Southeastern plants in batch

Common Name Current Range Recovery Plan
Morefield’s leather flower AL, TN Morefield’s Leather Flower Clematis morefieldii Recovery Plan
Alabama canebrake pitcher-plant AL Alabama Canebrake Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia rubra ssp. alabamensis) Recovery Plan
Apalachicola rosemary FL Recovery Plan for Apalachicola Rosemary (Conradina glabra)
Chapman rhododendron FL Recovery Plan for Chapman’s Rhododendron, Rododendron chapmanii
Gentian pinkroot AL, FL Recovery Plan for Spigelia gentianoides (Gentian pinkroot)
Four-petal pawpaw FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Fragrant prickly-apple FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Florida perforate cladonia FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Short-leaved rosemary FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Avon Park harebells FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Garrett’s mint FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Scrub mint FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Snakeroot FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Highlands scrub hypericum FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Scrub blazingstar FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Lewton’s polygala FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Wireweed FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Sandlace FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Carter’s mustard FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Florida ziziphus FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Okeechobee gourd FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan
Key tree-cactus FL South Florida Multi-Species Recovery Plan

Contact

Brian Hires, public affairs specialist
brian_hires@fws.gov, (703) 358-2191

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who can make it happen, visit fws.gov. Connect with the Service on Facebook, follow our tweets, watch the YouTube Channel and download photos from Flickr.

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