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Secretary Zinke announces more that $1.1 billion for sportsmen and conservation

This year marks $20 billion in hunter and angler conservation funding

Horicon, Wisconsin – Today U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke traveled to Horicon, Wisconsin, where he announced more than $1.1 billion in annual national funding for state wildlife agencies from revenues generated by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration (PRDJ) acts. The Secretary presented a ceremonial check to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for $34,966,603 while visiting the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area. Download state-by-state listings of the final Fiscal Year 2018 apportionments of the Wildlife Restoration Program fund and the Sport Fish Restoration Program fund. Allocations of the funds are authorized by Congress. To date, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has distributed more than $20.2 billion in apportionments for state conservation and recreation projects.

“American sportsmen and women are some of our best conservationists and they contribute billions of dollars toward wildlife conservation and sportsmen access every year through the Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson Acts,” said Secretary Zinke. “For nearly eighty years, states have been able to fund important conservation initiatives thanks to the more than $20 billion that has generated nationwide. Every time a firearm, fishing pole, hook, bullet, motor boat or boat fuel is sold, part of that cost goes to fund conservation. The best way to increase funding for conservation and sportsmen access is to increase the number of hunters and anglers in our woods and waters. The American conservation model has been replicated all over the world because it works.”

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources manages over 11,000 acres of the Horicon Marsh and almost every habitat project they complete includes PRDJ dollars, including prescribed burning, invasive species treatments, wetland berm maintenance, prairie seeding and restoration, timber stand improvement.

The funds, which are distributed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, support critical state conservation and outdoor recreation projects. They are derived from excise taxes paid by the hunting, archery, shooting, boating and angling industries on firearms, archery equipment, ammunition, sport fishing equipment, and a portion of gasoline tax attributable to motorboat fuel and small engines.

Wisconsin boaters generate $1.18 billion of economic impact annually while hunting contributes to $2.5 billion in yearly economic impact. Angling creates over 21,000 jobs while impacting the economy to the tune of $2.3 billion each year.

“These funds are integral to our ability to provide hunting and fishing access, restore habitat and manage species at the state level,” said Daniel L. Meyer, Secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. “We greatly value the partnership we have with the Service and the Department of Interior.”

State total Total Sportfish Restoration (9501) Total - All wildlife funds (FY18) Total - All funds (FY18)
Alabama $6,151,179 $19,360,421 $25,511,600
Alaska $17,595,874 $33,455,771 $51,051,645
American Samoa $1,173,058 $1,328,563 $2,501,621
Arizona $7,154,503 $22,080,003 $29,234,506
Arkansas $5,348,981 $13,221,723 $18,570,704
California $16,513,733 $26,037,993 $42,551,726
Colorado $9,143,673 $19,872,123 $29,015,796
Connecticut $3,519,175 $5,901,190 $9,420,365
Delaware $3,519,175 $4,785,824 $8,304,999
District of Columbia $1,173,058 $0 $1,173,058
Florida $12,236,611 $14,351,398 $26,588,009
Georgia $8,041,424 $23,213,465 $31,254,889
Guam $1,173,058 $1,328,563 $2,501,621
Hawaii $3,519,175 $4,785,824 $8,304,999
Idaho $6,430,284 $15,474,320 $21,904,604
Illinois $6,593,209 $16,335,080 $22,928,289
Indiana $4,577,731 $13,573,699 $18,151,430
Iowa $4,513,130 $11,515,178 $16,028,308
Kansas $4,981,927 $14,646,057 $19,627,984
Kentucky $5,198,763 $14,127,290 $19,326,053
Louisiana $6,908,171 $15,884,383 $22,792,554
Maine $3,519,175 $8,055,283 $11,574,458
Maryland $3,519,175 $7,754,551 $11,273,726
Massachusetts $3,519,175 $7,986,372 $11,505,547
Michigan $10,692,452 $24,296,525 $34,988,977
Minnesota $12,500,370 $23,400,370 $35,900,740
Mississippi $4,009,209 $12,144,757 $16,153,966
Missouri $7,677,750 $21,117,103 $28,794,853
Montana $8,648,987 $21,131,270 $29,780,257
N. Mariana Islands $1,173,058 $1,328,563 $2,501,621
Nebraska $4,483,366 $12,833,330 $17,316,696
Nevada $4,974,601 $13,948,153 $18,922,754
New Hampshire $3,519,175 $4,785,824 $8,304,999
New Jersey $3,519,175 $7,986,372 $11,505,547
New Mexico $6,244,495 $15,787,434 $22,031,929
New York $7,820,180 $20,862,345 $28,682,525
North Carolina $10,344,499 $21,338,737 $31,683,236
North Dakota $4,130,618 $11,377,784 $15,508,402
Ohio $6,898,966 $16,457,632 $23,356,598
Oklahoma $7,695,368 $19,907,732 $27,603,100
Oregon $7,820,246 $17,690,588 $25,510,834
Pennsylvania $8,571,622 $28,157,633 $36,729,255
Puerto Rico $3,519,175 $3,452,263 $6,971,438
Rhode Island $3,519,175 $4,785,824 $8,304,999
South Carolina $4,899,188 $10,678,793 $15,577,981
South Dakota $4,490,053 $13,775,104 $18,265,157
Tennessee $7,457,271 $22,544,767 $30,002,038
Texas $17,595,874 $36,656,319 $54,252,193
Utah $6,405,939 $14,616,342 $21,022,281
Vermont $3,519,175 $4,785,824 $8,304,999
Virgin Islands $1,173,058 $1,328,563 $2,501,621
Virginia $5,204,846 $14,176,335 $19,381,181
Washington $7,112,530 $15,120,458 $22,232,988
West Virginia $3,519,175 $8,209,596 $11,728,771
Wisconsin $11,424,513 $23,542,090 $34,966,603
Wyoming $5,329,957 $13,861,148 $19,191,105
Total $351,917,483 $797,160,652 $1,149,078,135

The recipient state wildlife agencies have matched these funds with approximately $6.7 billion throughout the years, primarily through hunting and fishing license revenues.

Learn more about the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration program.

Contact

Interior_Press@ios.doi.gov

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who can make it happen, visit fws.gov. Connect with the Service on Facebook, follow our tweets, watch the YouTube Channel and download photos from Flickr.

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