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A bald eagle prepares for flight. Photo by Richard Keen / RMA.

Bald eagle killed in Grand Rivers, Kentucky $2,500 reward offered for information leading to a conviction

A dead bald eagle with blood on its beak face down on leaf covered grass.
Bald eagle found dead along Paradise Road, in Grand Rivers, Kentucky. Photo by KY Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

A mature bald eagle was found dead by Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Conservation Officer Evan Ethington on January 8, 2016, along Paradise Road, in Grand Rivers, Kentucky.  The shooting is believed to have occurred between December 25, 2015, and January 2, 2016. 

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are jointly investigating this incident and seek information related to the shooting.

Bald eagles are protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.  Killing or harming a bird carries maximum penalties of up to $100,000 in fines and one year in prison.

The Service is offering a reward of up to $2,500 for information leading to a conviction of the person or persons responsible for this unlawful act.

To provide information on this killing, contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent at 270-252-7336, or the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources Conservation Officer Evan Ethington at 270-890-3300.

Species information:  Bald eagles take four to five years to mature, but many do not start breeding until they are much older.  Bald eagles may live 15-25 years in the wild.  They are opportunistic feeders with fish comprising most of their diet and are found around rivers and lakes.  Bald eagles historically occurred from Mexico to Alaska.

Contacts

Phil Kloer, philip_kloer@fws.gov
Public Affairs Specialist
404-679-7299

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who can make it happen, visit fws.gov. Connect with the Service on Facebook, follow our tweets, watch the YouTube Channel and download photos from Flickr.

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