skip to content
Three men hold a bald eagles wings wide for measurement.
Information icon (L) Timmy Murray, who found this dead bald eagle, helps measure it with Mississippi Wildlife Fisheries and parks Conservation Officers Ron McMillan and (R) Christopher Rounsville. Photo taken by Jan Hilbunn, George County Times (601) 947-2967. George County Times has given the Service verbal permission to use the photograph for a press release.

Reward offered for information on killing of a bald eagle in Lucedale, Mississippi - $2,500 to help identify the shooter

A bald eagle was shot on February 10, 2012, in Lucedale, Mississippi. The shooting took place near the George County Co-Op. Investigators are seeking information related to the shooting. A joint investigation is being conducted by Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“Every eagle, hawk, vulture, and crane is protected,” said Ben Bryant, Special Agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Lacombe, La. “There is no excuse for shooting them.”

Bald eagles are protected by the federal Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

The Service is offering a reward of up to $2,500 for information that leads to a conviction.

Species information: Bald eagles take four to five years to mature, but many do not start breeding until they are much older. Bald eagles may live 15-25 years in the wild. They are opportunistic feeders with fish comprising most of their diet and are found around rivers and lakes. Bald eagles historically occurred from Mexico to Alaska.

Please contact: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Ben Bryant at (985) 882-3756 or Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks at 1-800-Be-Smart with any information.

A bald eagle was shot on February 10, 2012, in Lucedale, Mississippi.  The shooting took place near the George County Co-Op.  Investigators are seeking information related to the shooting.  A joint investigation is being conducted by Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“Every eagle, hawk, vulture, and crane is protected,” said Ben Bryant, Special Agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Lacombe, La.  “There is no excuse for shooting them.”

Bald eagles are protected by the federal Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act.  

The Service is offering a reward of up to $2,500 for information that leads to a conviction.

Species information:  Bald eagles take four to five years to mature, but many do not start breeding until they are much older.  Bald eagles may live 15-25 years in the wild.  They are opportunistic feeders with fish comprising most of their diet and are found around rivers and lakes.  Bald eagles historically occurred from Mexico to Alaska. 

Please contact:  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Ben Bryant at (985) 882-3756 or Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks at 1-800-Be-Smart with any information.

Contact

Division of Public Affairs
External Affairs
Telephone: 703-358-2220
Website: https://www.fws.gov/external-affairs/public-affairs/

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who can make it happen, visit fws.gov. Connect with the Service on Facebook, follow our tweets, watch the YouTube Channel and download photos from Flickr.

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn