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  • Bright green needles emerge from a central cone of a longleaf pine tree
    Information icon Longleaf pine needles. Photo by Dot Paul, USDA NRCS.

    Seeing the forest for the trees

    April 6, 2016 | 3 minute read

    More than 30 animal species that depend on longleaf pine forests are federally listed as endangered or threatened, and many more are considered to be at-risk. This is why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with partners to restore longleaf pine across the southeastern United States.  Read the full story...

  • A close up photo of a gray-silver salamander walking on a layer of wet moss.
    Information icon Cheoah bald salamander. Photo by Andy Kraemer, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Four Southeastern species do not require federal protection, two others under further review

    March 15, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published a batch of 90-day findings affecting a variety of species across the nation. Biologists have determined the following species found in the southeastern United States do not require further review for federal protection at this time: Cheoah bald salamander in North Carolina Monito skink in Puerto Rico Southern dusky salamander in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and possibly South Carolina South Mountain gray-cheeked salamander in North Carolina.  Read the full story...

  • Kemps ridley sea turtle laying in the sand. Large with grey shell and yellow body with grey speckles.
    Kemps ridley sea turtle. Photo by NER Sea Turtle Stranding Network.

    New report assesses the impacts of emerging threats on Gulf coast species and ecosystems

    November 13, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released its Gulf Coast Vulnerability Assessment (GCVA), a comprehensive report that evaluates the effects of climate change, sea level rise and urbanization on four Gulf Coast ecosystems and 11 species that depend on them. The ecosystems are mangrove, oyster reef, tidal emergent marsh and barrier islands. The species are roseate spoonbill, blue crab, clapper rail, mottled duck, spotted seatrout, eastern oyster, American oystercatcher, red drum, black skimmer, Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and Wilson’s plover.  Read the full story...

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.
    Information icon Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

    Service, states, celebrate 20th anniversary of the safe harbor program offering voluntary land management agreements with private landowners

    November 6, 2015 | 4 minute read

    More than 400 private landowners across nine states are voluntarily managing their forests through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Safe Harbor Program to benefit the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker. The eight State agencies administering the program to landowners received special recognition this week at the Annual Conference of the Southeastern Association Fish and Wildlife Agencies meeting in Asheville, North Carolina. “Private landowners have voluntarily enrolled almost 2.5 million acres in the Safe Harbor Program benefitting 835 groups of red-cockaded woodpeckers,” said Leopoldo Miranda, Assistant Regional Director of Ecological Services in the Southeast Region.  Read the full story...

  • A white and black frog standing on dormant grass.
    Mississippi gopher frog. Photo by John A. Tupy, Western Carolina University.

    Recovery plan for endangered frog available

    September 9, 2015 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the final recovery plan for the dusky gopher frog, federally listed as endangered. The dusky gopher frog, a stocky frog with a loud, guttural call, is heard less often now in the longleaf pine forests of Mississippi. Once also found in Louisiana and Alabama, now it is only found in four locations in Harrison and Jackson counties in southern Mississippi.  Read the full story...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Service awards grants to 35 states, District of Columbia for work on deadly bat disease

    July 1, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced grant awards totaling just under $1 million to 35 states and the District of Columbia for white-nose syndrome (WNS) projects. State natural resource agencies will use the funds to support research, monitor bat populations and prepare for and respond to WNS, a disease that afflicts bats. “White-nose syndrome has now been confirmed in 26 states and five Canadian provinces,” said Dr. Jeremy Coleman, the Service’s national WNS coordinator.  Read the full story...

  • A dark colored salamander with white spots on its stomach and sides.
    Caddo Mountain salamander. Photo by Aposematic herpetologist, CC-BY-NC 2.0.

    Federal wildlife officials respond to a petition to list dozens of species under the Endangered Species Act

    June 30, 2015 | 3 minute read

    In response to a 2012 petition claiming 53 reptiles and amphibians require federal protection under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) today published a batch of 90-day findings affecting 15 species of frogs, salamanders, snakes, skinks and crayfish found in the Southeast. Five petitioned species will not be given further consideration for federal protection at this time, and 10 species have triggered a deeper scientific review.  Read the full story...

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