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Dozens of bright green trees growing out of a flooded river bank
Information icon Cypress swamp at Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

Stories

  • An eastward view of St. Andrews Bay and the Fort Morgan Peninsula in coastal Alabama.
    Information icon An eastward view of St. Andrews Bay and the Fort Morgan Peninsula in coastal Alabama. Photo Credit: USFWS

    Preserving utopia: Pilot Town’s history and addition to Bon Secour

    October 18, 2021 | 9 minute read

    As part of the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Regionwide Trustee Implementation Group’s first restoration plan, Pilot Town is being acquired as part of Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • A black bird with white speckling and red eyes in a biologist’s hand.
    Information icon Eastern black rail being banded. Photo credit: Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Secrets of the Marsh: A Partnership to Protect a Rare Bird

    July 9, 2021 | 3 minute read

    The Eastern black rail is more often heard than seen, if observed at all. This small, secretive marsh bird is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and lives in shallow, grassy wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. In South Carolina, the black rail has found a home in a unique wetland system with more than 300 years of human involvement. While this presents a daunting challenge, a recent South Carolina Coastal Program partnership put conservation on the ground and preserved a cultural heritage.  Learn more...

  • A bright orange sunrise looking down a coastal beach with a silhouette recording data from the dunes with a golf cart midway between the silhouette and the surf
    Information icon Sunrise on Dauphin Island, Alabama Audubon staff conducts some early morning monitoring activities. Photo by Drew Heffenden, Nature Travel Specialists

    In Alabama, conservation is for the birds

    March 1, 2021 | 5 minute read

    Whether it’s the Yellowhammer State or the Cotton State, whatever you call the state of Alabama, an abundance of birds calls it home. “Yellowhammer” in fact refers to the common name for the northern flicker woodpecker — which just happens to be the state bird of Alabama. Specifically, coastal Alabama is home to a treasure trove of avian species that nest on the beach and use the area for stopover on their migratory journeys around the world.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a coastal marsh with a breakwater.
    Information icon Aerial photograph of PO-0148 Living Shoreline Demonstration Project, constructed in 2016, which provides approximately three miles of reef breakwater structure along the shoreline of Eloi Point. The adjacent Biloxi Marsh Living Shoreline Project, PO-0174, will create an additional nine to eleven miles of reef breakwaters. Photo by Gulf Coast Aerial Mapping, Mott Macdonald, Louisiana CPRA.

    In defense for our shorelines, the natural way

    August 5, 2020 | 5 minute read

    It’s that time of year again. The sun is shining, the air is thick with heat and humidity, and people have begun to watch their weather forecasts with a nervous eye out for a special set of names — the names associated with tropical storms and hurricanes. Meteorologists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have predicted an above-normal to near-normal hurricane season, as evidenced with the recent storm event of Hurricane Hanna in south Texas.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a river cutting through a marsh emptying into a the Gulf of Mexico.
    Information icon A View South over Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Grand Bay, MS. Photo by USFWS.

    Gulf of Mexico Restoration Benefits Wetlands and Recreation

    June 24, 2020 | 5 minute read

    As we transition from American Wetlands Month through National Great Outdoors Month, it is the perfect time to showcase the restoration progress we continue to make in the Gulf of Mexico region. The Deepwater Horizon explosion occurred 10 years ago this spring and we’ve read many stories about the explosion and the sad impact the spill has had on wildlife and habitat. Oil fouled more than 1,300 miles of shoreline from Texas to Florida.  Learn more...

  • A large brown and white bird with a scooped beak nears the ground for a landing
    Information icon Brown Pelican landing. Photo by Steve Hillebrand, USFWS.

    Native returns to Queen Bess

    June 10, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Ten years ago, a brown pelican was rescued from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. He was eventually returned to the waters of the Gulf, but before being released was fit with a leg band bearing his new name—A04. And now, A04 has become part of an even bigger success story than its survival alone might suggest. He’s nesting on Queen Bess Refuge—one of thousands of nesting pairs that are making the first post-restoration nesting season on there a huge success.  Learn more...

  • A lone pine tree stands tall on a narrow peninsula along a bay
    Information icon Weeks Bay marsh, Alabama. Photo by Weeks Bay NERR.

    Gateway to Weeks Bay conserved for future generations

    June 2, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Whether gliding through the mouth of Weeks Bay by motor or paddle craft, the first strip of land that catches a voyager’s eye is the East Gateway Tract. The tract is roughly 175 acres of critically important and diverse land that includes micro-dune habitat, tidal streams, marshland, and forested wetlands. The water surrounding East Gateway is a prime fishing location with a prevalence of redfish and speckled trout, which is not to be outdone by the bird watching opportunities on the tract, as it provides wonderful habitat for migratory birds.  Learn more...

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