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Dozens of bright green trees growing out of a flooded river bank
Information icon Cypress swamp at Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

Stories

  • A beach in a cove lined with green grass and tall pine trees
    Information icon Shoreline at future Lynn Haven park site. Photo by USFWS.

    New public park will protect Panama City crayfish

    February 18, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Lynn Haven, Florida — A new public park located along the shore of North Bay and McKitchen’s Bayou in Lynn Haven will not only provide public access to waterways and recreational facilities, but will also protect rapidly disappearing habitat for the Panama City crayfish, a species the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed for federal listing. The park will be bought and maintained using funds from the Deepwater Horizon National Resource Damage Assessment settlement.  Learn more...

  • An upland forest edge after mechanical thinning
    Information icon Grand Bay habitat area after mastication. Photo by USFWS.

    Deepwater Horizon settlement Funds help Mississippi coastal habitats

    December 17, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Habitat management activities are well underway on the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Grand Bay Land Acquisition and Habitat Management Project.  Learn more...

  • New maps aid conservation in Louisiana

    December 16, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Recent revisions to a federal report on the nation’s wetlands indicate that coastal areas are losing wetlands more quickly than the rest of the nation — none more so than those along the Gulf of Mexico. The rate of the loss appears to be accelerating, too. Among the findings: beginning in 2004, an estimated 5% of all saltmarsh habitat vanished to open waters along the Gulf of Mexico during a 4½-year period.  Learn more...

  • Grasses line the bank of lagoon on a sunny day
    Information icon “Working with our partners to restore the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge shoreline along Little Lagoon is very exciting,” Jackie Sablan, Bon Secour NWR Wildlife Ecologist, says. “Once complete, this restoration project will enhance the existing shoreline, while at the same time creating a buffer to protect existing refuge infrastructure and the endangered Alabama beach mouse habitat directly south of the project area.” Photo by Mississippi - Alabama Sea Grant.

    Deepwater Horizon settlement funds new living shoreline at national wildlife refuge

    December 11, 2019 | 3 minute read

    In early November, a team of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) biologists, one archeologist, and their non-governmental partners met along the shore of Little Lagoon in Alabama’s Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge with the goal of restoring part of the lagoon’s eroding shoreline. The team was more than ready to begin installing native wetland plants. The Little Lagoon Living Shoreline Project was approved by the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustees; specifically, the Alabama Trustee Implementation Group, which includes members of the Service’s Gulf Restoration Office, in its second post-global settlement restoration plan.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above
    Information icon Aerial view of Queen Bess Island, which supports an important brown pelican rookery in Louisiana. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    Streamlined environmental compliance process benefits brown pelican rookery

    August 20, 2019 | 4 minute read

    “Good Queen Bess” (a.k.a. Queen Elizabeth I) is credited with putting an end to a period of instability in mid-16th century England. Unfortunately, the tiny scrap of land in Louisiana that bears her name, Queen Bess Island, has been anything but stable. The island, located about two-and-a-half miles north of Grand Isle in Barataria Bay, has been sinking and eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a matter of concern, as Queen Bess Island supports the third largest brown pelican rookery in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above
    Information icon Aerial view of Queen Bess Island, which supports an important brown pelican rookery in Louisiana. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    A head start on healing

    July 16, 2019 | 4 minute read

    “Good Queen Bess” (a.k.a. Queen Elizabeth I) is credited with putting an end to a period of instability in mid-16th century England. Unfortunately, the tiny scrap of land in Louisiana that bears her name, Queen Bess Island, has been anything but stable. The island, located about two and a half miles north of Grand Isle in Barataria Bay, has been sinking and eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a matter of concern, as Queen Bess Island supports the third largest brown pelican rookery in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Tall, yellow cylindrical plants growing on wet ground
    Information icon Trumpet pitcher plants. Photo © Atlanta Botanical Garden, used with permission.

    Seeps and springs and pitcher plants

    June 17, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Long ago, before Florida’s Panhandle was ditched, drained, paved and primed for development, there existed a rich tapestry of bogs, dunes, lakes and forests alongside the Gulf of Mexico. Bulldozers all but wiped out the rare coastal habitat. Pockets, though, remain. Pockets of pitcher plants and pine lilies; of seepage slopes and wet prairies; of wiregrass and sedges; and of butterflies and bees. Pine lily. Photo © Atlanta Botanical Garden, used with permission.  Learn more...

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