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A yellow and black bumble bee perched on a white flower.
Information icon Rusty-patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis). Photo by Dan Mullen, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

Additional information on six petitioned species including two snakes, two bees, a butterfly and a snail found in the Southeast

Any plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.”

When we are petitioned to provide federal protection to a species, our biologists review the information presented by the petitioner as well as the information in our files prior to the date of the petition to determine whether a closer look at the species’ status is advisable.

The six species included in these findings came from the following petitions to list them under the Endangered Species Act:

We have summarized the petitioner’s claims as well as our findings below. More detail is available by clicking the link to the Federal Register docket number for each species.

Not substantial findings

One petitioned species found in the Southeast will not be given further consideration for federal protection at this time.

Cahaba pebblesnail

Federal Register docket: FWS-R4-ES-2015-0079

A cahaba pebblesnail shell; dark with white and beige splotches in a spiral pattern.
Cahaba pebblesnail by Roberto Verzo, Wikipedia Commons.

Known occurrences: Alabama

The Institute for Wildlife Protection claims that the Cahaba pebblesnail warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction due to water pollution, livestock grazing, conversion of habitat, roads, off-road vehicles, military operations, oil and gas operations, mining, and prospecting, utility corridors and powerlines, air pollution, acid precipitation, and fragmentation
  • Disease
  • Predation
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms
  • Natural or manmade factors including invasive species, noise, acoustic interference and disturbance, weather effects, climate change and global warming, ozone layer depletion, chemical and radiological agents, habitat recovery time, and effects of small population size

Based on our review of the petition, sources cited in the petition, and information available in our files at the time the petition was received, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

Substantial findings

A more thorough scientific review known as a 12-month finding has been triggered for the following species. The Fish and Wildlife Service will seek to collect additional scientific and commercial data to determine whether these species may require federal protection.

To submit your information, please contact Andreas Moshogianis.

Blue calamintha bee

Federal Register docket: FWS-R4-ES-2015-0077

A small, fuzzy bee pollenating a flower as it retrieves nectar.
Blue calamintha bee © Tim Lethbrdige, used with permission.

Known occurrences: Florida

The Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating the petitioned action may be warranted. The petition presented substantial information on the following factors:

  • Present or threatened destruction, modification or curtailment of its habitat or range
  • Disease
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence

However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.

Florida pine snake

Federal Register docket: FWS-R4-ES-2015-0086

A light colord snake coiled up.  Brown splotches pattern the snakes scales.
Florida pine snake by Kevin Enge, FWC.

Known occurrences: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina

The Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating the petitioned action may be warranted. The petition presented substantial information on the following factors:

  • Present or threatened destruction, modification or curtailment of its habitat or range
  • Predation
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence

However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.

Regal fritillary

Federal Register docket: FWS-R3-ES-2015-0078

A bright orange and black butterfly perched on a large yellow flower covered in pollen.
Regal fritillary by Laura Hubers, USFWS.

Known occurrences: Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, D.C., West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming

The Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating the petitioned action may be warranted. The petition presented substantial information on the following factors:

  • Present or threatened destruction, modification or curtailment of its habitat or range
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence

However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.

Rusty patched bumble bee

Federal Register docket: FWS-R4-ES-2015-0112

A close-up photo of a bee with leathery wings and thick yellow hair.
Rusty patched bumble bee by Smithsonian National Zoo.

Known occurrences: Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

The Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating the petitioned action may be warranted. The petition presented substantial information on the following factors:

  • Present or threatened destruction, modification or curtailment of its habitat or range
  • Disease
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence

However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.

Short-tailed snake

Federal Register docket: FWS-R4-ES-2015-0116

A coiled snake with a white, black and orange splotches.
Short-tailed snake by FWC.

Known occurrences: Florida

The Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating the petitioned action may be warranted. The petitioner presented substantial information on the following factors:

  • Present or threatened destruction, modification or curtailment of its habitat or range
  • Predation
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence

However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.

Note: the petitioner refers to this species as Lampropeltis extenuata, formerly Stilosoma extenuatum, and provides information that the genus Stilosoma may be nested within the genus Lampropeltis (Pyron and Burbrink 2009, p. 528). However, information in our files indicates that this species is referred to as Stilosoma extenuatum. We will continue to refer to this species as Stilosoma extenuatum and evaluate the taxonomy during our status review.

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