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A rocky stream bed covered by a canopy of trees.
Information icon Rocks and boulders line the bottom and banks of this stretch of proctor creek. Photo by Katherine Taylor, USFWS.

E-Grits

Where southeast employees get their news

E-Grits covers news, notes, and highlights about the conservation work of our employees across the Service’s 10-state Southeast Region.

  • water topels over a foot drop after a dam was removed on the Sucarnoochee River.
    Information icon Native fishes and mussels can move upstream after removal of Livingston Dam in Alabama. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Livingston Dam: A restoration story

    April 10, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Livingston, Alabama — The Sucarnoochee River is a sleepy coastal plain river that snakes its way through the Black Belt (the band of fertile soil crossing central Alabama and northeast Mississippi), near the University of West Alabama. The ‘nooch has only been studied by a handful of scientists and is not well known as a major tourist destination. Home to unique animals with comparably unique names, like bankclimber, fawnsfoot, Alabama orb, bluehead chub, and naked sand darter, this river contributes to the state of Alabama’s depth of aquatic biodiversity.  Learn more...

  • A dozen or so small grey fish next to a ruler.
    Information icon Adult saltmarsh topminnows. Photo by Ronald Paille, USFWS.

    Looking for the saltmarsh topminnow in coastal Louisiana

    March 12, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned by WildEarth Guardians to list the saltmarsh topminnow under the Endangered Species Act. Not much is known about the topminnow’s distribution and biology so the Service is researching this species. According to scientific literature, the topminnow occurs in marshes along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. It is a small non-migratory estuarine fish which reaches up to three inches long. It forages on the marsh surface during high tides, and retreats to small tidal creeks and rivulets during low tide.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of shore birds line a sand bank with yellow oil boom in the background.
    Information icon North Breton Island, like many barrier islands, provides habitat for a wide range of bird species. Photo by Greg Thompson, USFWS.

    Restoring a buffet for birds on North Breton Island

    February 6, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Any mention of Louisiana frequently d conjures up images of delicious Cajun and Creole food – po’boys, gumbo, jambalaya and more. “Barrier islands” probably won’t pop into most people’s heads. But these islands are vitally important because they protect Louisiana communities from the impact of storms by acting like speed bumps, absorbing wind and wave energy. In addition, they provide essential habitat for birds and other wildlife. North Breton Island, part of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge, is one such barrier island.  Learn more...

  • Over twenty African-American students and members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity posing for a photo.
    Information icon Members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity enjoy the outdoors at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Phi Beta Sigma.

    Like birds of a feather

    February 4, 2019 | 3 minute read

    While the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. may not, at first glance, seem to have much in common, the two organizations, like birds of a feather, have been flocking together to develop young men as well as conserve fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Phi Beta Sigma (Sigma) is a fraternal organization founded in 1914 that focuses on issues that impact African American communities. The fraternity has over 700 collegiate and alumni chapters across the country.  Learn more...

  • Eight volunteers, half women, half men, pose in front of the welcome sign at Bayou Teche NWR
    Information icon AmeriCorps NCCC crew at Bayou Teche National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Bayou Teche boardwalk trail open for adventure thanks to volunteers

    January 30, 2019 | 2 minute read

    As the cypress and tupelo trees along the bayou began to turn their fall yellow and russet colors, an AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) team arrived in Southeast Louisiana. This traveling crew of eight young adults, aged 18 to 25, were excited to gain leadership and job skills while making a difference at Bayou Teche refuge. Their stewardship mission for three weeks was to repair an interpretive boardwalk that winds through a wetland area.  Learn more...

  • A handmade bottlecap ornament hanging from a tree with a child in the background.
    Information icon A snowman ornament made from recycled bottle caps. Photo by Moria Painter, USFWS.

    Celebrating the season with nature crafts

    December 20, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery and the Friends of Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery hosted a Holiday Open House that drew more than 200 people to the hatchery on a chilly December day.  Learn more...

  • West Tennessee refuges host first Wounded Warrior deer hunt

    December 13, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge in Brownsville, Tennessee, hosted 10 warriors for the refuge’s first annual Wounded Warrior hunt on Saturday, November 17. On hand to greet them were Tennessee State Senator Dolores Gresham, Brownsville Mayor Bill Rawls, and Haywood County Mayor David Livingston. Community sponsors, Insouth Bank of Brownsville and Brownsville Exchange Club, provided a dinner on Friday night and lunch on Saturday. Refuge employees put up 10 blinds and tree stands and assisted the hunters.  Learn more...

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