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An orange, black and white butterfly perched on a white flower.
Information icon Monarch butterfly on Sullivans Island. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

Wildlife

  • Fuzzy yellow and purple flowers emerging from a green grass-like stalk.
    Information icon American chaffseed © Robert Sincliar. Copyright release form S://EA/Photo Permissions/american-chaffseed.pdf

    American chaffseed

    American chaffseed is generally found in habitats described as open, moist pine flatwoods, fire-maintained savannas, and flowers from April to June in the South, and from June to mid-July in the North.  Visit the species profile...

  • Seven small brownish-yellow mussels held in open hands by a biologist.
    Information icon Atlantic pigtoes ready for release. Photo by USFWS.

    Atlantic pigtoe

    The Atlantic pigtoe is a small freshwater clam found in Virginia, North Carolina, and historically in South Carolina and Georgia.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.
    Information icon Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com, used with permission.

    Black-capped petrel

    Taxon: Bird Range: Breeds on Hispaniola within the countries of Dominican Republic and Haiti; forages offshore in waters of the Atlantic off the coast of northern South America through North America as far north as Maine, occasionally further into Canada Status: Proposed for listing as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act The black-capped petrel is a seabird found in North America and the Caribbean, and is known by several common names: “black-capped petrel,” “capped petrel,” and “West Indian petrel” in North America and on English-speaking islands.  Visit the species profile...

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    Information icon Bunched arrowhead. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bunched arrowhead

    Bunched arrowhead is a small herbaceous plant growing 15-16 inches tall in saturated soils. The white flowers begin blooming in mid-May and continue through July. The fruits mature a few weeks after flowering.  Visit the species profile...

  • A dark colored mussel embedded in a stream bed, open filtering water.
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.

    Carolina heelsplitter

    Taxon: Mussel Range: North Carolina, South Carolina Status: Listed as endangered on June 30, 1993 Related content Sep 28, 2018 | 2 minute read Articles Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter Mar 9, 2018 | 3 minute read News Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species Oct 13, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles Fish passage project benefits Carolina heelsplitter Jun 12, 2017 | 7 minute read Articles Musseling back from near extinction Jun 6, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles North Carolina biologist recognized for work to recover endangered species May 19, 2017 | 8 minute read News 2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions Jun 2, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolinas Conservation Aquaculture Center Aug 4, 2010 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolina’s conservation aquaculture center Wildlife Carolina heelsplitter Appearance The Carolina heelsplitter freshwater mussel was first described in 1852.  Visit the species profile...

  • Carolina pygmy sunfish

    The Carolina pygmy sunfish is a member of the family Elassomatidae, a family of small secretive fish containing six known species found only in the southeastern United States.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

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