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A man wearing a green plaid shirt pulls his horse's face close to his own
Information icon Roger Revenelle and his horse Hugo. Photo by Jessica Collier, USFWS.

Stories

  • A military officer in uniform releases a gopher tortoise next to a burrow.
    Col. Matthew Higer, 96th Test Wing vice commander, bends down to release a gopher tortoise into its new home deep within the Eglin Air Force Base. Photo by Samuel King Jr., U.S. Air Force.

    Boosting the gopher tortoise

    August 22, 2017 | 8 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia – Typically, animals like the Florida panther lose their Southern habitat, dwindle perilously close to extinction and end up on the endangered species list. Federal, state and non-profit groups hustle to raise money and conserve land to bolster the populations with the chance, one day, of delisting it. The gopher tortoise, though, just might buck the trend. An at-risk species in Georgia, Florida and parts of Alabama and South Carolina, the tank-like tortoise is the recipient of an unprecedented, high-dollar collaboration between government agencies, NGOs and the private sector to keep gopherus polyphemus from ever gracing the threatened or endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • Fuzzy yellow and purple flowers emerging from a green grass-like stalk.
    Information icon American chaffseed. Photo © Robert Sincliar. Copyright release form S://EA/Photo Permissions/american-chaffseed.pdf

    Recovery progress for the American chaffseed

    June 27, 2017 | 2 minute read

    American chaffseed is a perennial herb that has been listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act since 1992. As part of an ongoing recovery effort, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) recently introduced 70 seedlings in Dorchester County, South Carolina. The project included Service Partners for Fish and Wildlife biologist Joe Cockrell, Service botanist April Punsalan, and Jeff Glitzenstein, a research associate with Tall Timbers. The seedlings were planted in an open area of restored longleaf pine forest and near the edge of a restored freshwater depressional wetland on an Audubon chapter preserve.  Learn more...

  • A dozen dark mussels in a propagation tank with sandy substrate.
    Carolina heelsplitter mussels. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Musseling back from near extinction

    June 12, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Only an estimated 154 Carolina heelsplitters remain in the wild. A shocking revelation for a species that’s been listed as endangered since 1993, but biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) will not give up. Finding the Carolina heelsplitter, one of the most imperiled freshwater mussels in the Southeast, will bring delight to any biologist lucky enough to wade in its waters. Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.  Learn more...

  • A pool formed on a rocky mountain top in front of a sunset.
    Information icon A granite outcrop on Arabia Mountain in Georgia. Photo by David Akoubian, The Nature Conservancy.

    Digging new pools: How an experiment on Georgia granite mountains is increasing endangered and threatened plants

    May 22, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Since 2007, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Georgia ecological services office started counting the tiny green plants that can only be found in vernal pools on granite outcrops during the rainy season from December through March and during mid-summer rain events. (Vernal pools are temporary pools of water that provide habitat for distinctive plants and animals.) Stone Mountain, Arabia Mountain and Heggie’s Rock, all in Georgia, are granite outcrops. Because they are protected, they are some of the only granite outcrops where rare endemic green plants, such as the federally-listed black-spored quillwort, mat-forming quillwort, and pool sprite, can still be found.  Learn more...

  • A biologist in a red shirt poses in front of a display with a corn snake.
    Information icon Whitney Wiest, South Carolina Field Office’s Fish and Wildlife Biologist, with Penny, the corn snake. Photo, Chris Hernandez, USFWS.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife goes “wild”

    May 22, 2017 | 2 minute read

    For the past 35 years, Charleston, South Carolina, has gone wild during the month of February. In what has become known as the largest event of its kind in the nation, the Southeastern Wildlife Exposition never fails to disappoint. The three-day art and wildlife exposition exceeded attendance records this year with over 43,000 attendees. Chris Hernandez, South Carolina Field Office’s Coastal Program Biologist, with Penny, the corn snake.  Learn more...

  • A tiny beige tortoise walking on sandy soil.
    Baby gopher tortoise. Photo by Randy Browning, USFWS.

    Protecting military readiness and the iconic gopher tortoise at the same time

    March 24, 2017 | 6 minute read

    Tifton, Georgia – There isn’t a military base for 50 miles, but the Army plays a critical role at the Alapaha River Wildlife Management Area. A first-in-the-nation conservation plan, crafted by the U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and wildlife agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina, protects at-risk gopher tortoises here while helping military bases to continue training and testing missions across the tortoise’s Southern turf.  Learn more...

  • A bird on the wing with black feathers on its wings and white breast.
    Swallow-tailed kite. Photo by Walter Rodriguez, CC BY 2.0.

    Tracking “Panther,” the swallow-tailed kite

    November 28, 2016 | 2 minute read

    June 8, 2016, was an exciting day at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge when the Avian Research and Conservation Institute captured a swallow-tailed kite, now known as “Panther”, and fitted him with a GPS tracking transmitter funded by Friends of the Florida Panther Refuge. Panther has given collaborators the opportunity to follow his travels from refuge nesting grounds, more than 600 miles up to South Carolina, then back down to cross the Gulf of Mexico and the Andes for southbound migration.  Learn more...

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