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A man wearing a green plaid shirt pulls his horse's face close to his own
Information icon Roger Revenelle and his horse Hugo. Photo by Jessica Collier, USFWS.

Stories

  • An entrance gate with a historical marker.
    Information icon Entry road to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion’s grave and Oakland Club. Photo by Jason Ayers, USFWS.

    South Carolina Coastal Program helps protect 11,000 acres in Berkeley County

    September 26, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The 11,000-acre, privately-owned Oakland Club, located in Berkeley County, South Carolina, is now a permanently protected site for several state species of concern and federally protected species. These species include bobwhite quail, American chaffseed, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, red-cockaded woodpeckers, swallow-tailed kites, Swainson’s warblers, and Southern hognose snakes. Once home to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion, the Oakland Club parallels the Santee River and lies between the Francis Marion National Forest and the Santee National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute read

    East Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground.  Learn more...

  • The beach at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge goes dark mid afternoon during the solar eclipse.
    Information icon Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuges goes dark during the total solar eclipse. Photo by Kristen Peters, USFWS.

    Dark delight

    August 23, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – The solar eclipse of 2017 seemed to approach slowly. In truth, it came hurtling toward the eastern edge of America at more than 1,000 mph, a 70-mile-wide swath of temporary nightfall that stopped traffic and quickened hearts.  Learn more...

  • A man and a woman stand in front of the welcome sign at a South Carolina refuge.
    Information icon Cindy Dohner, regional director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ Region 4, and Greg Sheehan. He recently became the principal deputy director at the Service. Photo by Kristen Peters

    Director: Refuge ‘a natural treasure’

    August 23, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – Ask Greg Sheehan what he thinks about the nation’s wildlife refuges and be prepared to wait for his response. For Sheehan, principal deputy director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), something as important as the nation’s 500-plus refuges deserves a measured answer. They are that important. As he stood under the branches of a dead tree that had succumbed to the ocean at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, Sheehan thought about America’s wild lands – the mountains, the prairies, the beaches that surrender to the tireless tides.  Learn more...

  • A military officer in uniform releases a gopher tortoise next to a burrow.
    Col. Matthew Higer, 96th Test Wing vice commander, bends down to release a gopher tortoise into its new home deep within the Eglin Air Force Base. Photo by Samuel King Jr., U.S. Air Force.

    Boosting the gopher tortoise

    August 22, 2017 | 8 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia – Typically, animals like the Florida panther lose their Southern habitat, dwindle perilously close to extinction and end up on the endangered species list. Federal, state and non-profit groups hustle to raise money and conserve land to bolster the populations with the chance, one day, of delisting it. The gopher tortoise, though, just might buck the trend. An at-risk species in Georgia, Florida and parts of Alabama and South Carolina, the tank-like tortoise is the recipient of an unprecedented, high-dollar collaboration between government agencies, NGOs and the private sector to keep gopherus polyphemus from ever gracing the threatened or endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • Fuzzy yellow and purple flowers emerging from a green grass-like stalk.
    Information icon American chaffseed. Photo © Robert Sincliar. Copyright release form S://EA/Photo Permissions/american-chaffseed.pdf

    Recovery progress for the American chaffseed

    June 27, 2017 | 2 minute read

    American chaffseed is a perennial herb that has been listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act since 1992. As part of an ongoing recovery effort, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) recently introduced 70 seedlings in Dorchester County, South Carolina. The project included Service Partners for Fish and Wildlife biologist Joe Cockrell, Service botanist April Punsalan, and Jeff Glitzenstein, a research associate with Tall Timbers. The seedlings were planted in an open area of restored longleaf pine forest and near the edge of a restored freshwater depressional wetland on an Audubon chapter preserve.  Learn more...

  • A dozen dark mussels in a propagation tank with sandy substrate.
    Carolina heelsplitter mussels. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Musseling back from near extinction

    June 12, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Only an estimated 154 Carolina heelsplitters remain in the wild. A shocking revelation for a species that’s been listed as endangered since 1993, but biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) will not give up. Finding the Carolina heelsplitter, one of the most imperiled freshwater mussels in the Southeast, will bring delight to any biologist lucky enough to wade in its waters. Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.  Learn more...

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