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A man wearing a green plaid shirt pulls his horse's face close to his own
Information icon Roger Revenelle and his horse Hugo. Photo by Jessica Collier, USFWS.

Stories

  • Two USFWS employees chatting in front of a marsh.
    Information icon Nancy Fernandez and Monica Harris share a moment at the Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Connecting urban and rural

    November 8, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Nancy Fernandez’s job is to lure more Americans into the great outdoors. Sounds simple enough. But here’s what she’s up against:  Learn more...

  • Bright green grass emerges from a huge marsh.
    Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina is a kayaker’s paradise. Photo by Eric Horan, USFWS.

    Refuges reach out to urban visitors

    November 8, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Hilton Head Island, South Carolina — The hiker was in bad shape. Overweight and exhausted, she had crumpled into a sitting position along the Ibis Pond Trail at the Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge. Her face turned red, almost purple. Sweat poured in torrents. Her breathing was labored. Heat stroke seemed imminent under the searing sun with temperatures nearing 100 degrees. Monica Harris and Nancy Fernandez — mercifully — happened by in their U.  Learn more...

  • Water flows freely under a new bridge.
    Information icon Gills Creek Drive crossing at Gills Creek after replacement Photo by USFWS.

    Fish passage project benefits Carolina heelsplitter

    October 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    In Lancaster County, South Carolina, more than three miles of critical habitat has been cleared for the Carolina heelsplitter, a mussel federally listed as endangered. Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS. The county is home to about one-third of the heelsplitter’s remaining occupied habitat. In South Carolina, the heelsplitter is only found in the Savannah, Saluda, Catawba and Pee Dee river systems in York, Lancaster, Chester, Kershaw, Chesterfield, Edgefield, McCormick, Greenwood, and Saluda Counties.  Learn more...

  • An entrance gate with a historical marker.
    Information icon Entry road to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion’s grave and Oakland Club. Photo by Jason Ayers, USFWS.

    South Carolina Coastal Program helps protect 11,000 acres in Berkeley County

    September 26, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The 11,000-acre, privately-owned Oakland Club, located in Berkeley County, South Carolina, is now a permanently protected site for several state species of concern and federally protected species. These species include bobwhite quail, American chaffseed, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, red-cockaded woodpeckers, swallow-tailed kites, Swainson’s warblers, and Southern hognose snakes. Once home to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion, the Oakland Club parallels the Santee River and lies between the Francis Marion National Forest and the Santee National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute read

    East Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground.  Learn more...

  • The beach at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge goes dark mid afternoon during the solar eclipse.
    Information icon Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuges goes dark during the total solar eclipse. Photo by Kristen Peters, USFWS.

    Dark delight

    August 23, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – The solar eclipse of 2017 seemed to approach slowly. In truth, it came hurtling toward the eastern edge of America at more than 1,000 mph, a 70-mile-wide swath of temporary nightfall that stopped traffic and quickened hearts.  Learn more...

  • A man and a woman stand in front of the welcome sign at a South Carolina refuge.
    Information icon Cindy Dohner, regional director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ Region 4, and Greg Sheehan. He recently became the principal deputy director at the Service. Photo by Kristen Peters

    Director: Refuge ‘a natural treasure’

    August 23, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – Ask Greg Sheehan what he thinks about the nation’s wildlife refuges and be prepared to wait for his response. For Sheehan, principal deputy director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), something as important as the nation’s 500-plus refuges deserves a measured answer. They are that important. As he stood under the branches of a dead tree that had succumbed to the ocean at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, Sheehan thought about America’s wild lands – the mountains, the prairies, the beaches that surrender to the tireless tides.  Learn more...

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