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A man wearing a green plaid shirt pulls his horse's face close to his own
Information icon Roger Revenelle and his horse Hugo. Photo by Jessica Collier, USFWS.

Stories

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen mussels marked with id numbers
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitters ready to be stocked. Photo by FWS.

    Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter

    September 28, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Ellison McDow and his grandfather Donnie Evans displaying Carolina heelsplitters that will soon be released on Mr. Evan’s property. Photo by FWS. South Carolina, like many states in the Southeast Region, is mostly made up of private lands. Therefore, these lands and their owners are crucial to any effort aimed at recovery of endangered species. Last fall, a number of private entities voluntarily contributed to the ongoing recovery efforts for the critically endangered Carolina heelsplitter, a freshwater mussel.  Learn more...

  • A man wearing a yellow hard hat and firefighting gear
    Information icon Stephen McGuin. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    On the front lines

    July 27, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Austin Griffin and Stephen McGuin are training to become wildland firefighters, an odd career choice given their unusual, at-times troubled backgrounds. Yet they’re perfect fits for a still-new training program crafted by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to put a diverse and economically disadvantaged cadre of young men and women on the front firefighting lines.  Learn more...

  • Veterans carry their hog through a swamp.
    Information icon Two wounded warriors and a volunteer, accompanied by a cameraman, carry a feral pig through the swamp at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by SOWW.

    Hog heaven

    March 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Feral pigs are widely considered a nuisance species. The wild hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion in property damage every year all over the United States on both public and private lands, according to the Mississippi State University Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts. They are an invasive species that can disrupt entire food chains. “They’re really bad for the ecosystem,” said Craig Sasser, refuge manager at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina.  Learn more...

  • Two dozen primary school students gather around an instructor and a small fire.
    Information icon Describing the benefits of prescribed fire. Photo by Durwin Carter, USFWS.

    Wood Magic happens at Sewee Visitor Center

    December 21, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Have you ever wondered how paper is made from trees? Do you know why it’s important to recycle paper? Do you know that when a log is cut at the saw mill everything is used to make different wood products? Why do foresters use prescribed burning for forested areas? What are some gifts from the forest? Just ask South Carolina a fifth graders who attended the Wood Magic Forest Fair at the the Service’s Sewee Visitor and Environmental Education Center in Awendaw, South Carolina in November.  Learn more...

  • A small green plant growing in a sand dune with bright red/pink stems.
    Seabeach amaranth at Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune, NC. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    From Massachusetts to South Carolina, recovering seabeach amaranth

    December 7, 2017 | 6 minute read

    This is a story about people, places and a plant — but it’s more than just that. This is a story about faith in a tiny little seed and the huge potential for recovering a threatened species. First things first — the plant Most people have probably never heard of seabeach amaranth, but for such an obscure little dune plant, it bears a mighty burden. This low-growing annual colonizes newly disturbed habitats such as over-wash areas at the end of barrier islands and flat, low-lying areas along the foremost dunes.  Learn more...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    The woodpecker’s journey

    November 20, 2017 | 9 minute read

    It was getting dark. A light rain fell. Distant thunder rolled across the steamy, late-summer sky. The hunters were apprehensive. Their prey: endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers.  Learn more...

  • A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.
    Information icon The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

    Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Hurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds.  Learn more...

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