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A man wearing a green plaid shirt pulls his horse's face close to his own
Information icon Roger Revenelle and his horse Hugo. Photo by Jessica Collier, USFWS.

Stories

  • A longleaf pine stand with tall, narrow trees and a sparse understory
    Information icon Longleaf pines on Odell Byrd’s land in Chesterfield County, South Carolina, may someday be home to red-cockaded woodpeckers. Photo © Charles Babb, used with permission.

    South Carolina Partners for Fish and Wildlife restore red-cockaded woodpecker habitat

    February 14, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Good things can flow from all sorts of motivations. Odell Byrd did not start out wanting to establish new nesting areas for endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers. He had a few acres of land that his grandfather had originally bought after World War II, part of which had been a family farm at one time, and which now was too overgrown to hike through easily. “I wanted to thin out the undergrowth so I could walk through and enjoy my forest,” he said.  Learn more...

  • A calm river banked on both sides by tall trees.
    Information icon Groton Plantation fronts 24 miles of the Savannah River. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    What the world used to look like

    December 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Estill, South Carolina — The descendants of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony nearly 400 years ago, recently set aside 14,000 acres along the Savannah River that will forever remain undeveloped. It is the largest private conservation easement in South Carolina history. Its significance, though, goes well beyond the creation of a natural bulwark against overdevelopment and forest loss. A bevy of private, commercial, nonprofit and government donors, including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, cobbled together the $12.  Learn more...

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • A new culvert under a bridge allows water to flow freely rather than through narrow channels.
    Information icon Downstream view of the Gills Creek Drive road crossing after culvert replacement. Photo, Morgan Wolf, USFWS

    Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem

    October 28, 2019 | 2 minute read

    If you had asked recovery biologists 10 years ago to list the best places to return mussels to the wild, Gills Creek would have been at the very bottom of that list. The small South Carolina stream had been through a lot. Too much, it seemed, to recover. Situated just south of Charlotte, North Carolina, and east of Lancaster, South Carolina, the watershed had seen the advance of suburban sprawl, and was battling ongoing agricultural degradation.  Learn more...

  • A beach covered in sea turtle eggs and other debris washed ashore from Hurricane Dorian
    Information icon Debris and sea turtle eggs washed up by Hurricane Dorian at Archie Carr NWR. Photo by Erin Seney, UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.

    Dorian report: Sea-turtle nest losses could have been worse

    September 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Hurricane Dorian obliterated hundreds of sea-turtle nests at National Wildlife Refuges as it clawed north along the Atlantic coast earlier this month, officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) said. But it could have been much worse. The storm, wildlife refuge staff noted, had dissipated as it neared the fragile, sandy shores where turtles lay eggs. It obliterated some nests, but left others intact. Eroded sand dunes and a lost sea turtle egg at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • Radar image showing the eye of Hurricane Hugo impacting the South Carolina coast
    Information icon Hurricane Hugo satellite imagery, September 22nd, 1989. Radar map by NOAA/National Hurricane Center.

    Hurricane Hugo and the woodpeckers: the silver lining of a monster storm

    September 16, 2019 | 13 minute read

    As sad as it is to admit, September has almost become a month of dread for residents of the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. On guard 24⁄7, headlines from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center with proclamations like “NOAA increases chance for above-normal hurricane season” create that all too familiar angst as residents sponge up every advisory issued by the National Hurricane Center. Woven together with data from satellites and sensors, citizens are fed an endless array of spaghetti models that are updated frequently, making real-time tracking possible for our ever-connected society.  Learn more...

  • A small bird in hand with white patches on its wing and a red patch behind its eye
    Information icon A male red-cockaded woodpecker showing off the red feathers behind its head called a cockade. Photo © Robert B. Clontz, The Nature Conservancy.

    Joining forces

    August 27, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Fort Stewart, Georgia — As military partnerships go, this has to be one of the oddest, and strongest. The fighting men and women of the 3rd Infantry Division train alongside… red-cockaded woodpeckers. Ft. Stewart just west of Savannah and north of Hinesville, GA. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. Soldiers maneuver the eastern edge of the army base under a canopy of longleaf pine where the iconic woodpeckers make their home.  Learn more...

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