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  • A low-growing shrub with leaves like sand dollars
    Information icon A rare hairy rattleweed plant. Photo by Daniel Chapman, USFWS.

    Learning to love a hairy rattleweed

    February 18, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia — It sounds like the name of a punk rocker, or an illicit drug. It lurks under power lines, along roadsides and between rows of commercial pine trees. It’s covered in tiny, cobwebby hairs. It’s got a shape only a botanist could love. Pity the little-known, inelegantly named hairy rattleweed, or Baptisia arachnifera. It is one of the nation’s rarest plants, found in only two southeast Georgia counties and federally listed as an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • A beach in a cove lined with green grass and tall pine trees
    Information icon Shoreline at future Lynn Haven park site. Photo by USFWS.

    New public park will protect Panama City crayfish

    February 18, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Lynn Haven, Florida — A new public park located along the shore of North Bay and McKitchen’s Bayou in Lynn Haven will not only provide public access to waterways and recreational facilities, but will also protect rapidly disappearing habitat for the Panama City crayfish, a species the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed for federal listing. The park will be bought and maintained using funds from the Deepwater Horizon National Resource Damage Assessment settlement.  Learn more...

  • A longleaf pine stand with tall, narrow trees and a sparse understory
    Information icon Longleaf pines on Odell Byrd’s land in Chesterfield County, South Carolina, may someday be home to red-cockaded woodpeckers. Photo © Charles Babb, used with permission.

    South Carolina Partners for Fish and Wildlife restore red-cockaded woodpecker habitat

    February 14, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Good things can flow from all sorts of motivations. Odell Byrd did not start out wanting to establish new nesting areas for endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers. He had a few acres of land that his grandfather had originally bought after World War II, part of which had been a family farm at one time, and which now was too overgrown to hike through easily. “I wanted to thin out the undergrowth so I could walk through and enjoy my forest,” he said.  Learn more...

  • A vidographer films as a wildlife biologist returns a black snake to its natural habitat
    Information icon BBC-PBS crew filming TNC's David Printiss at TNC's Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve with threatened eastern indigo snake. Photo by The Nature Conservancy.

    “PBS Nature: Wild Florida” Captures Beauty and Challenges of Conservation Work

    February 10, 2020 | 1 minute read

    Show airs 8 p.m. Feb. 12 Florida is well-known for its beaches and year-round sun, but it is also home to a wild side, with pine forests, coral reefs, manatees, and the Everglades, the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States. Every year, this state faces the full forces of nature: from wildfires to flooding to powerful hurricanes. Now, a growing human population, rising sea levels and abandoned exotic pets, like the Burmese python, are added threats to this wild paradise.  Learn more...

  • A small spotted frog in a petri dish with wet vegetation.
    Information icon Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery has been raising gopher frogs for three years, a departure from its traditional responsibilities of propagating fish. Photo by USFWS.

    A good year at the hatcheries

    February 5, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The results are in from another year of propagating snakes and birds and tortoises. The verdict? Allan Brown, help us out. “Good,” said Brown, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Assistant Regional Director of Fish and Aquatic Conservation. “Actually, better than that. It was great.” Brown oversees a Service office that increasingly focuses on more than just fish. Hatcheries across the region are raising an array of creatures — indigo snakes, Florida grasshopper sparrows and mussels of various stripes, to name a few — in addition to taking care of traditional duties: propagating fish.  Learn more...

  • Service staff stand under a Chattahoochee Forest NFH tent for an event
    Information icon Welcome tent at the Scout event. Photo by Volunteer Scout Leader.

    Chattahoochee Forest NFH (GA) educates scouts about trout fishing

    January 24, 2020 | 1 minute read

    On Nov., 2019, Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery program assistant Crystal Thomas and volunteer Mike Morton staffed a booth about trout fishing during the 2019 Hornaday Weekend-Atlanta Area Council at the Woodruff Scout Camp in North Georgia. Hundreds of scouts from all over the southeastern United States visited the hatchery booth seeking information about trout fishing, ethics and conservation. Some were seasoned at fishing while others were seeking a first-time experience.  Learn more...

  • A vine grows over a small pond covered in algae and fallen shrub branches
    Information icon Okeechobee gourd vines spreading across the landscape at restoration site. Photo by Rob Hopper, South Florida Water Management District.

    Okeechobee gourd thriving at Everglades restoration site

    January 23, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The endangered Okeechobee gourd got a new home and started the new year, and for that matter, the new decade with a bang. Previous efforts to successfully translocate the gourd and establish new populations were relatively unsuccessful, due to issues that included hydrology, predation, and invasive competition. However, in the summer of 2019, several locations within the Sam Jones/Abiaki Prairie Restoration site south of Lake Okeechobee were planted with the gourd, and today they are thriving.  Learn more...

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