U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Sacramento Fish & Wildlife OfficeServing the people, conserving the fish, wildlife, and plants of California

A Unit Of The Pacific Southwest Region

#WeConserve

April 18, 2019

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Photo of Jennifer Norris holding a WeConserve Sierra Ecosystems sign.
SFWO Field Supervisor Jennifer Norris works with staff and partners to conserve Sierra ecosystems. Photo credit: Scott Norris.
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Photo of Leif Goude holding a WeConserve Herps sign.
SFWO Biologist Leif Goude supports herpetological conservation. Photo credit: Veronica Davison, USFWS.
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Group photo holding a WeConserve Sierra Nevada Yellow-legged Frogs sign.
SFWO and Oakland Zoo staff work together to conserve Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frogs. Photo credit: Bobby Castagna.
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Group photo holding a WeConserve Native Species sign.
SFWO Field Supervisor Jennifer Norris and Recovery and Listing Division Chief Josh Hull join National Park Service staff in support of native species. Photo credit: Rachel Mazur.
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Photo of Valerie Hentges holding a WeConserve Vernal Pool Habitat sign.
SFWO Biologist Valerie Hentges is working to conserve vernal pool habitat.
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Photo of Jan Knight holding a WeConserve Land Scapes sign.
Habitat is key for SFWO Deputy Field Supervisor Jan Knight who encourages conservation of “landscapes.” Photo credit: Veronica Davison, USFWS.
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Group photo holding a WeConserve CA red-legged frogs sign.
SFWO Sierra Cascades Division Chief Rick Kuyper and Biologist Ian Vogel collaborate with Yosemite National Park Aquatic Ecologist Rob Grasso to protect California Red-legged frogs, but the one pictured here is a paper cut-out. Photo credit: Lisa Acree, Yosemite National Park.
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Group photo holding a WeConserve Vernal Landscapes sign.
SFWO Senior Biologist Valerie Layne works with Caltrans to conserve vernal pool landscapes
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Group photo holding a WeConserve Together sign.
SFWO staff collaborate with representatives from Ridge Top Ranch LLC and WRA Environmental Consultants to support wildlife and plant species at Ridge Top Ranch Conservation Ban. Photo credit: Veronica Davison, USFWS.
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Photo of Nick Etcheverry holding a WeConserve sign
Nick Etcheverry's partnership with the Service helps to establish and maintain important habitat for endangered species.
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Photo of Wyatt Milne holding a WeConserve sign
Avid hunter Wyatt Milne supports conservation by reporting banded waterfowl. Photo credit: Veronica Davison, USFWS.
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Photo of students holding a WeConserve sign
Caleb Greenwood Elementary School students use their schoolyard habitat to conserve water. Photo credit: Anna Symkowick-Rose
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Photo of Valerie Henteges holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO Wildlife Biologist Valerie Hentges supports conservation of habitats for the California tiger salamander and California red-legged frog. Photo credit: Veronica Davison, USFWS.
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Photo of students at California State University holding a WeConserve sign
Students at California State University, Sacramento show their support for science-based conservation.
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Photo of John Hull holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO's Josh Hull supports conservation of national parks. Photo credit: Josh Hull
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Photo of Amy Poopatanapong holding a WeConserve sign
ICF Wildlife Biologist Amy Poopatanapong supports conservation of burrowing owls. Photo credit: Veronica Davison, USFWS.
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Photo of employee holding a WeConserve sign
Westervelt Ecological Services is a key contributor in efforts to conserve the threatened valley elderberry longhorn beetle. Photo credit: McKenney Houck
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Photo of Kellie Berry holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO's Kellie Berry shows support for vernal pool conservation at Mather Field. Photo credit: Veronica Davison.
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Photo of Diana Jeffery holding a WeConserve sign
Grassland Ecologist Diana Jeffrey at Ring Mountain working on conservation of native plants. Photo credit: Valary Bloom, USFWS.
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Photo of PG&E employees holding WeConserve signs
PG&E employees show their support for conservation of listed species and natural resources. Photo credit: Veronica Davison, USFWS.
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Photo of employees holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO's Valary Bloom supports conservation of the endangered showy Indian clover. Photo credit: Diana Jeffery.
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Photo of person holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO partner Westervelt Ecological Services partner supports conservation of vernal pool species. Photo credit: Matt Gause.
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Photo of Henry Hahler and Holley Kline holding a WeConserve sign
Henry Hahler and Holley Kline support vernal pool conservation. Photo Credit: Jason Peters.
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Photo of person holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO works closely with Westervelt Ecological Services on projects that protect vernal pools and grassland areas. Photo credit: Tara Collins.
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Photo of staff holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO staff work with the Sonoma County Water Agency, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, California Department of Water Resources, HT Harvey and Associates, Gold Ridge RCD, and Area West Environmental on California Tiger Salamander conservation.
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Photo of SFWO partner holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO partner Westervelt Ecological Services creates mitigation banks that provide habitat for the threatened giant garter snake. Photo credit: Sarah Correa.
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Photo of Serge Gushkoff holding a WeConserve sign
California Department of Fish & Wildlife's Serge Gushkoff supports conservation of the threatened California tiger salamander. Photo credit: Veronica Daviso, USFWS.
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Photo of SFWO partner holding a WeConserve sign
SFWO partners like Westervelt Ecological Services are critical to advancing conservation efforts throughout Northern California in support of the California tiger salamander. Photo Credit: Tara Collins.
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Photo of Colleen Moore holding a WeConserve sign
California State University, Sacramento graduate student Colleen Moore supports native salmonid conservation.
Join us in celebrating Earth Day on April 22 by supporting wildlife conservation. Consider volunteering on public lands near you. There are over 500 wildlife refuges and hatcheries across the nation that offer volunteer opportunities. Locate your nearest refuge or hatchery and get involved. Visit the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 10 eco tips webpage for more activities that benefit wildlife on Earth Day and year-round.
Earth Day 2019

Last updated: April 18, 2019