Refuge Law Enforcement

Protecting Your National Wildlife Refuges

What We Do

Protection

Equipped with a keen understanding of conservation rules and regulations; extensive training in progressive and proactive law enforcement practices; and genuine concern and affection for the
outdoors, Federal Wildlife Officers safeguard America’s wildlife, habitat, and treasured federal lands and waters.

Conservation

Federal Wildlife Officers are conservation officers, first and foremost. From king salmon protection in Alaska, to combating illegal reptile collection in Arizona, to enforcing Manatee Zones in Florida, to waterfowl hunting and fishing in Oregon, Federal Wildlife Officers face the
challenges that every game warden in every state faces. As guardians of wildlife, our Federal Wildlife Officers ensure that wildlife dependent uses are enjoyed in manner that
protects natural resources now, and for the future. In all, our Federal Wildlife Officers help protect 850 million acres of lands and waters, home to some 392 threatened and endangered species, 700 species of birds, more than 1000 fish species, and iconic species such as the American bison, elk, grizzly bear, and more!

Service

A day in the life of a Federal Wildlife Officer could include teaching youth how to fish, meeting with State Conservation Officers to discuss an upcoming deer decoy operation, assisting the refuge biologists with an elk population survey, backing up the local sheriff’s officer on a traffic stop, or waking up in the middle of the night to head to a neighboring state to assist with search and rescue operations.

Federal Wildlife Officers in Action

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Who We Are

Federal Wildlife Officer doing biology.

What We Do

Federal Wildlife Officer.

Career Information

Federal Wildlife Officers.
The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.
Last modified: November 30, 2017
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.