Recent Bird Sightings

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Below are the most recent sightings for various locations along the Refuge.  

Sightings are updated as reports come in from staff and volunteers.

If you are interested in reporting sightings please contact the Refuge at 608-779-2399.

Happy Birding!

 

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This camera is operated by the Raptor Resources Program.

 All questions should be directed to john@raptorresource.org

  • Refuge Highlights

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    Last Updated: 11/18/2018

    Tundra Swans can be seen in large numbers at this time, one of the best locations to view the Swans is the Brownsville Overlook just south of Brownsville Minnesota.

     

     

  • Weaver Bottoms - Lower Pool 5

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    Updated 11/5/2018

     
    Dabblers: 5,000 - 7,000 gadwall, mallards, and wigeon

    Divers: 10,000 - 15,000 ringnecks, scaup, and canvasbacks, most easily seen from MN Hwy 61.

    Tundra Swans: 50 - 75 swans seen from MN Hwy 61. Quite a few of the swans were trumpeters and there were 2 mute swans.

    American White Pelicans: about 20 were seen on the far side of the area

    Bald Eagles: this was an evening check so it was too late for good bald eagle viewing.

    Highlights: 5,000 - 10,000 American coots


     

     

  • Trempealeau NWR - Pool 6

  • Lake Onalaska Overlook - Lower Pool 7

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    Updated 11/16/2018

     

    Dabblers: 40 mallards and 4 gadwall


    Divers: 60 canvasback, 12 ring-necked ducks, 40 bufflehead, 20 goldeneyes


    Tundra Swans: Visible with a spotting scope on the far side of the river (closer to Minnesota)


    American White Pelicans: none visible

    Bald Eagles: none flew over when she was there


    Highlights: Both male and female ducks were present in many of the species!


     

  • Shady Maple Overlook - Lower Pool 8

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    Updated 11/14/2018

     

    • 11,500 estimated waterfowl - similar to last week but ice cover changed where the birds were distributed across the closed area.
    • species observed (15): wood duck, mallard, Northern pintail, gadwall, Ame. wigeon, Northern shoveler, canvasback, ring-necked duck, scaup, common goldeneye, bufflehead, hooded merganser, Canada geese, swans (~500), Ame. white pelicans.
    • Mallard and Canada geese were way up this week, while wigeon, gadwall and pintail numbers were lower in the closed area.
    • There was a few thousand swans in the distance near the Brownsville Overlook, with a few hundred getting up and settling back down.

     

  • Brownsville Overlook - Lower Pool 8

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    Updated 11/18/2018

     

    Brownsville Overlook

    Dabblers: 50-100 mallards, gadwall, wigeon and shovelers could be observed right at the overlook.  Numbers are reduced quite a bit compared to a week or two ago.

     

    Swans: 100-200 could be observed right at the overlook.  There are still 8,000-10,000 in the Wisconsin Islands Closed Area as a whole but ice has formed on some of the areas they were using a week or so ago.

     

    Bald eagles: 25-50 could be seen flying, sitting on islands or perched in shoreline trees.

     


     


     


     

  • Hwy 26 Overlook - Lower Pool 8

     

    Updated 11/18/2018 

     

    Dabblers: 50-100 mallards, gadwall, wigeon and shovelers could be observed right at the overlook.  Numbers are reduced quite a bit compared to a week or two ago.

     

    Divers: 50-100 canvasbacks were observed very close to the overlook which is somewhat unusual.  Thousands more divers could be observed much farther away in the open area of Pool 8 and were best observed with a scope.

     

    Swans: 200-300 could be observed right at the overlook.  Ice prevented them from using the many of the areas closest to the overlook but they were still within 1/8th of a mile and provided good views with binoculars.  Hundreds more were observed in scattered groups among the wild rice beds extending downstream.

     

    Bald eagles: 25-50 could be seen flying, sitting on islands or perched in shoreline trees.

     


     

     

     

  • Reno Walk-in - Lower Pool 8

    Updated 11/12/2018

     

    Dabblers: 2,000-3,000 seen close to the dam.  4,000-5,000 farther away and best seen with a scope.

     

    Divers: 15,000-25,000 canvasbacks, scaup and ringnecks, many of them close to the dam or at the edge of the wild rice beds.

     

    Tundra swans: At least 1,000, many of them close to the dam and some on the edges of the wild rice bed.

     

    Bald eagles: at least 100-150 seen perching on trees, islands and logs, and flying overhead.


     

     

  • Savanna District - Pools 12-14

  • Other Sources of Recent Sightings