Resource Management

Resource Management


The district works in partnership with many landowners, agencies and conservation organizations to restore and protect prairie, wetlands and oak savanna. This work includes habitat restoration and the promotion of programs to improve water quality in the St. Croix River Watershed.

Other resource management tools used by the district include: grazing to stimulate the growth of grasses and forbs while setting back the growth of invading trees; controlling invasive species with chemical treatments; burning more than 1,000 acres per year to maintain grassland; and mowing to maintain grassland. The district also works with private landowners to restore habitat through the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program (Partners). The Partners program works with private landowners to cost share restoration of important wetland and grassland habitat in the district. 

Trapping Occurs on this Wetland Management District

Trapping is a wildlife management tool used on some national wildlife refuge system lands. Trapping may be used to protect endangered and threatened species or migratory birds or to control certain wildlife populations. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also views trapping as a legitimate recreational and economic activity when there are harvestable surpluses of fur-bearing mammals. Outside of Alaska, refuge system lands that permit trapping as a recreational use may require trappers to obtain a special use permit. Signs are posted at district offices where trapping occurs. Contact the district manager for specific regulations. Click here for more information.