Resource Management

Resource Management


Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge manages habitat for wildlife through a variety of practices. Raising and lowering water levels and mowing aquatic plants helps maintain wild rice beds on Rice Lake. Prescribed burning reduces woody brush in fens. Timber harvest and alder mowing sets back natural succession, creating young forest and forest openings. Creating snags, or standing dead trees, helps create new den trees for cavity-nesting birds. Planting trees connects forest blocks and creates new young forest. Invasive species are detected early and treated to prevent negative impacts to the habitat. An active program of species and habitat inventory, monitoring and research drives habitat improvement and management adaptations - using the right management practices in the right places at the right time.

Trapping Occurs on this Refuge

Trapping is a wildlife management tool used on some national wildlife refuges. Trapping may be used to protect endangered and threatened species or migratory birds or to control certain wildlife populations. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also views trapping as a legitimate recreational and economic activity when there are harvestable surpluses of fur-bearing mammals. Outside of Alaska, refuges that permit trapping as a recreational use may require trappers to obtain a refuge special use permit. Signs are posted on refuges where trapping occurs. Contact the refuge manager for specific regulations. Click here for more information.