Get Involved

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More than 42,000 people volunteer their time and ideas each year to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Whether they work on the land, in a visitor center or with youth, they contribute to the conservation mission that reaches back more than a century. Become a volunteer or Refuge Friend to contribute your strength on behalf of America’s natural resources.


Support your National Wildlife Refuges by joining organizations such as the National Wildlife Refuge Association that actively supports and advocates for the National Wildlife Refuge System. Within the remote areas of the Pacific, Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Friends of Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge are non-profit organizations that help support millions of transitory wildlife and restoration projects on both islands and the ocean habitats in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

From its start in 1903, the National Wildlife Refuge System has owed its very existence to concerned citizens eager to protect America's natural resources. More than 200 nonprofit Refuge Friends organizations support national wildlife refuges, whether they work with a single refuge, a refuge complex or an entire state. Friends members are crucial to conserving and protecting our nation’s wildlife and teaching millions of Americans that their actions today determine the conservation legacy of tomorrow.

Visiting Johnston Atoll

Although the remote location and isolation of Johnston Atoll and other Pacific island refuges make it virtually impossible for the general public to visit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is hoping that advances in technology can one day bring to you the sites and sounds of this unique wildlife recovery site through internet based services.

Although the remote location and isolation of Johnston Atoll and other Pacific island refuges make it virtually impossible for the general public to visit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is hoping that advances in technology can one day bring to you the sites and sounds of this unique wildlife recovery site through internet based services.

Current Volunteer Opportunities

7-Month Biological Volunteers 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking four (4) biological volunteers to work at Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. This expedition is an expansion of the Crazy Ant Strike Team project (CAST). A major goal of the work effort remains the eradication of the Yellow Crazy Ant (YCA), Anoplolepis gracilipes, but a greater emphasis is now being placed on seabird and other biological resource monitoring. The training month in Honolulu, HI will begin in early May, with an early June departure for Johnston Atoll NWR.

Learn more about the position.