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Conservation

512x219_Whistling_duck_with_chicks

Delta National Wildlife Refuges' conservation objective is to serve as a haven for migratory birds and be maintained as productive habitat for other fish and wildlife species.

Refuge conservation plans are called “Comprehensive Conservation Plans” (CCPs). The Delta National Wildlife Refuge CCP outlines a management direction through 2023.

  • Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Photo of a clapper rail feeding on the mudflats

    Delta National Wildlife Refuge's Comprehensive Conservation Plan provides a vision for desired conditions of the Refuge. The plan is designed to support migratory birds, maintain habitats for a variety of fish and wildlife species, and provide opportunities for wildlife-dependent recreation, education, and interpretation activities.

    The CCP helps ensure that wildlife comes first while maintaining the ecological integrity of the Refuge and providing sustainable wildlife-dependent recreational activities.

    Click here for the Delta National Wildlife Refuge CCP

  • National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act

    Black necked stilts landing and foraging in shallow water copyright Bill Lang

    National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997: The NWRS Improvement Act defines a unifying mission for all refuges, including a process for determining compatible uses on refuges, and requiring that each refuge be managed according to a CCP. The NWRS Improvement  Act states that wildlife conservation is the priority of System lands and that the Secretary shall ensure that the biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of refuge lands are maintained. Each refuge must be managed to fulfill the specific purposes for which the refuge was established and the System mission. The first priority of each refuge is to conserve, manage, and if needed, restore fish and wildlife populations and habitats according to its purpose.

Page Photo Credits — John Heinz city refuge - USFWS, Great Swamp credit: USFWS, Credit:  USFWS
Last Updated: Apr 18, 2017
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