Rules and Regulations

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There are many interesting things to do and see during your visit to Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge, but it is our number one job to ensure wildlife and the habitat they call "home" is protected. Below are a few guidelines for visitors to help keep both you and the wildlife safe. 


 

Refuge property is marked on the outside boundary with yellow paint hash marks and blue goose boundary signs. Landowners adjacent to the refuge may mark their boundary with blue paint hash marks and no trespassing signs. Trespassing on posted or unmarked private property is a violation of Kentucky state law.

  • The Refuge is only open to the public from sunrise to sunset, with the exception of permitted hunting seasons. 
  • There is no camping allowed on the Refuge; campfires are also not permitted
  • Refuge signs define refuge boundaries. “Area closed” signs are erected to minimize disturbance to wildlife and for public safety. 
  • Pets on a leash are permitted. 
  • Bicycling is permitted on established roads.
  • Horseback riding is permitted on established roadways or trails.
  • Firearms are permitted on the refuge in accordance with state and local law.
  • Searching for and removal of objects of antiquity is prohibited.
  • Disturbing or feeding wildlife or collecting plants is not allowed.
  • ATV’s are prohibited.
  • Use of artificial lights, including vehicle lights, to observe wildlife is not allowed.
  • The Refuge is open during daylight hours.

For hunting and fishing regulations, please refer to our hunting brochure.

 

Trapping Occurs at this Refuge

Trapping is a wildlife management tool used on some national wildlife refuges. Trapping may be used to protect endangered and threatened species or migratory birds or to control certain wildlife populations. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also views trapping as a legitimate recreational and economic activity when there are harvestable surpluses of fur-bearing mammals. On this refuge trapping occurs only as a wildlife management tool and is prohibited by the public. Outside of Alaska, refuges that permit trapping as a recreational use may require trappers to obtain a refuge special use permit. Signs are posted on refuges where trapping occurs. Contact the refuge manager for specific regulations. Click here for more information.

 

 

For regulations specific to the Environmental Education and Recreation Area, click here.