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Law Enforcement


Protecting resources and people on our refuges is the fundamental responsibility of wildlife officers. The mission of the Refuge Law Enforcement Program is to support the administration of the National Wildlife Refuge System through the management and protection of natural, historic and cultural resources, property, and people on lands and waters of our national wildlife refuges.

Law Enforcement Objectives on Refuges

Law enforcement is an integral part of managing the National Wildlife Refuge System. Federal Wildlife Officers are responsible for upholding laws and regulations that protect natural resources, the public, and employees. These are our objectives:

To protect refuge visitors and employees from disturbance or harm by others.
To assist visitors in understanding refuge laws, regulations, and the reasons for them.
To enhance the management and protection of fish and wildlife resources on refuges.
To ensure the legally prescribed, equitable use of fish and wildlife resources on refuges.
To obtain compliance with laws and regulations necessary for the proper administration, management, and protection of the National Wildlife Refuge System.

Reporting Violations

If you see someone that is not abiding by the laws and regulations that have been established to preserve and protect Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, please report those violations as soon as possible by calling the following number and leaving a detailed message: 251-540-1131. To report an emergency please dial 911.

If you wish to remain anonymous, please provide as much information as possible in your message. Making false reports is a crime. All violators will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. You may also report violations by filling out this Violation Reporting Form. Please email the form to bonsecour@fws.gov or stop by the Bon Secour NWR office to fill the form out or drop one off.

Thank you for your assistance in helping to conserve some of Alabama's last remaining undisturbed coastal barrier habitat for the enjoyment of current and future generations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated: Aug 25, 2015
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