Southern New England-NY Bight Coastal Program
Northeast Region
 

News and Updates


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of an Environmental Assessment (EA) with a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Rhode Island South Coast Habitat and Community Resiliency Project: Ninigret Salt Marsh Restoration in Charlestown, RI

October 27, 2016 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of an Environmental Assessment (EA) with a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Rhode Island South Coast Habitat and Community Resiliency Project: Ninigret Salt Marsh Restoration in Charlestown, RI. The Proposed Action involves the use of dredge material to enhance degraded tidal marsh to the west of the Charlestown Breachway. The activities being proposed as part of this project are the subject of an EA that has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act to evaluate the impacts of the project on the human environment, including natural and cultural resources, and provide an opportunity for the public to review and comment on the project.

Comments will be accepted through November 30th, 2016 and can be sent to the Supervisor, New England Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 70 Commercial Street, Concord, New Hampshire 03301. Telephone: (603) 223-2541, Fax: (603) 223-0104 or via email to Suzanne_Paton@fws.gov.

FONSI
Environmental Assessment
Appendices



U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service requests public comment on an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Springborn Dam removal project located on the Scantic River in Enfield, Connecticut

July 13, 2016 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announce the availability of an Environmental Assessment (EA) with a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Springborn Dam removal project located on the Scantic River in Enfield, Connecticut. The Proposed Action involves removal of the timber crib, the masonry Dam structure, and accumulated sediment to restore the river channel. The purpose of the project is to reduce flooding risk for local communities, eliminate a public safety risk associated with an obsolete dam in poor condition, restore migratory and resident fish passage to upstream waters and to remove contaminated sediment from the Scantic River.

An EA has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act to evaluate the impacts of the project on the human environment, including natural and cultural resources, and provide an opportunity for the public to review and comment on the project. The EA analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives on the human environment. These alternatives include a No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action (preferred alternative), and two additional action alternatives.

Printed copies of the EA are available for review at the Enfield Central Library, 104 Middle Road, Enfield, CT and can be accessed online below. Comments will be accepted through July 31st, 2016 and can be sent to the Supervisor, New England Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 70 Commercial Street, Concord, New Hampshire 03301. Telephone: (603) 223-2541, Fax: (603) 223-0104 or email at Suzanne_Paton@fws.gov.

Springborn Dam Final Environmental Assessment (PDF-1.25MB)
Springborn Dam Finding of No Significant Impact (PDF-242KB)


The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service requests public comment on an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Hyde Pond Dam Removal Project in Stonington and Groton, Connecticut

August 28, 2015 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of an Environmental Assessment (EA) with a Finding of No Significant Impact for the Hyde Pond Dam Removal Project located on Whitford Brook in Stonington and Groton, Connecticut. The Proposed Action involves full depth and partial width removal of the spillway as well as the creation of a pilot stream channel via limited excavation of impounded sediment upstream of the existing Dam. The purpose of the proposed Project is to restore passage for migratory fish in Whitford Brook, eliminate the danger of dam failure, reduce local flooding, restore natural river flows that transport sediment to nourish marshes and beaches, and improve water quality.

An EA has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act to evaluate the impacts of the Project on the human environment, including natural and cultural resources, and provide an opportunity for the public to review and comment on the Project. The EA analyzes the potential impacts of three alternatives on the human environment. These alternatives include a No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action (preferred alternative), and one additional action alternative.

Comments will be accepted now through September 12, 2015 and may be sent to Thomas R. Chapman, Supervisor, New England Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 70 Commercial Street, Suite 300, Concord, New Hampshire 03301, telephone (603) 223-2541, fax (603) 223-0104, or by email to lori_benoit@fws.gov.

Hyde Pond EA with Appendix A
Hyde Pond EA Appendices B-E
Hyde Pond FONSI


The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service requests public comment on an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the White Rock Dam Removal Project in Stonington, Connecticut and Westerly, Rhode Island

July 17, 2015 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of an Environmental Assessment (EA) with a Finding of No Significant Impact for the White Rock Dam Removal Project located on the Pawcatuck River in Stonington, Connecticut and Westerly, Rhode Island. The Proposed Action involves full removal of the Dam, limited excavation of sediment downstream of the Dam, and construction of a permanent earthen berm at the upstream end of the former mill raceway. The purpose of the proposed Project is to restore unimpeded passage for migratory fish in the Pawcatuck River, mitigate flooding impacts from storms, and eliminate the danger of dam failure and associated impacts to downstream communities and infrastructure.

An EA has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act to evaluate the impacts of the Project on the human environment, including natural and cultural resources, and provide an opportunity for the public to review and comment on the Project. The EA analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives on the human environment. These alternatives include a No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action (preferred alternative), and two additional action alternatives.

Comments will be accepted now through July 24, 2015 and may be sent to Thomas R. Chapman, Supervisor, New England Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 70 Commercial Street, Suite 300, Concord, New Hampshire 03301, telephone (603) 223-2541, fax (603) 223-0104, or by email to lori_benoit@fws.gov.

White Rock - EA
White Rock – FONSI


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service requests public comment on an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Pond Lily Dam Removal Project in New Haven, Connecticut

May 28, 2015 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of an Environmental Assessment (EA) with a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Pond Lily Dam removal project located on the West River in New Haven, Connecticut. The Proposed Action involves removal of approximately half (100 feet) of the stone and earthen dam spillway and excavation of sediment to restore the river channel. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to restore migratory fish passage in the West River, improve water quality, enhance recreational opportunities in the Pond Lily Nature Preserve, and mitigate the danger of dam failure.

An Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act to evaluate the impacts of the Proposed Action on the human environment, including natural and cultural resources, and provide an opportunity for the public to review and comment on the project. The EA analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives on the human environment. These alternatives include a No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action (preferred alternative), and two additional action alternatives.

Comments can be sent to the Supervisor, New England Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 70 Commercial Street, Concord, New Hampshire 03301. Telephone: (603) 223-2541, Fax: (603) 223-0104 or email at lori_benoit@fws.gov.

Pond Lily EA
Appendix B
Appendix C
Pond Lily FONSI


Endangered status proposed for northern long-eared bat

Service Proposes to List Red Knot as a Threatened Species Under the Endangered Species Act

$1.6 million will support community-based projects improving the health of Long Island Sound

Read about the Long Island Sound Futures Fund.

Watch a news video covering the celebration of the Patuxent River dam removal on Sept. 30, 2011.

Watch Rhode Island students build wooden traps for the Service to use to find rare New England cottontails.

Hear NPR talk about American oystercatcher inventory and protection in Rhode Island.

Hear NPR talk about roseate tern protection on Faulkner Island, Conn.

 


Water Chestnut News

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service continues efforts to protect our Northeast waters

The Service and its partners continued to survey the Connecticut River watershed this year for the invasive water chestnut plant. Volunteers and staff, including Youth Conservation Corps crews, removed thick mats of the hardy, emerald green plants from waters in hopes to protect other wildlife in need of the sunlight blocked by this rampant aquatic invasive. Mechanical harvesters and aquatic herbicides have been used to try to control large populations, but it's difficult to ensure complete removal of the European plant

Audio, NPR story 2011: Hunting for the Invasive Water Chestnut
News story, Patch 2011: Water Chestnuts Creeping South
Website, Connecticut River


Sandy Point News

Landowners protect the beach and the birds of Sandy Point Island
Audio, NPR story 2011: When Biologists Protect One Bird From Another
Video, Sandy Point 2010: A Habitat We Share (.mov - allow time to load)
News release, October 2010: Partnership on Sandy Point Island Successfully Balances Recreation and ConservationSandy Point Press Release


Long Beach West News

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act signed by the President is an unprecedented effort to jumpstart our economy, create or save millions of jobs, and put a down payment on addressing long-neglected challenges so our country can thrive in the 21st Century.

The Southern New England-New York Bight Coastal Program received nearly $1 million dollars for the removal of abandoned cottages and the restoration of the important barrier beach and dunce complex of Long Beach, Connecticut.

PDF 2010: Long Beach Cottage Removal Project
Website, Department of the Interior Long Beach West Restoration Project
Audio, NPR story 2010: Tearing Down Buildings for Wildlife

Partners that led the 35-acre restoration of Stratford's Long Beach West were honored with a 2011 Environmental Achievement Award from the Department of the Interior. These awards honor extraordinary commitment to sustainable practices and environmental remediation at Department of the Interior sites.

News release, 2011: Fish and Wildlife Service Honored for Restoration, Sustainability Efforts
Website: Department of the Interior, Environmental Awards
PDF 2011: Award images (see page 13)

 


Last updated: March 13, 2017

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