Exhibit 1, 011 FW 2
Template for Writing Service Manual Chapters

Supersedes Exhibit 1, 011 FW 2, 02/22/10

Date: August 15, 2016

Series: Service Directives

Part 011: The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual

Originating Office: Division of Policy, Performance, and Management Programs

 

 

PDF Version

MS Word Version

 

Instructions:

 

(1) Use this template to format and write Service Manual chapters. The Division of Policy, Performance, and Management Programs (PPM) will format the headers and footers of your document before it goes to the Director’s office for signature.

 

(2) Do not use predetermined Microsoft Word styles (i.e., automatic numbering and lettering). They have to be stripped out later when we convert the MS Word document into HTML for publication on the internet.

 

(3) The template mixes formatting requirements with instructions and tips for writing. After you outline the topics and requirements you need to present, use this format to replace our words with yours.

 

 

Series: Series Title 

Part No. XXX: Part Title

Chapter No. XX: Chapter Title

New or Supersedes: If the chapter is new, type “New.” If it replaces an existing chapter, part of a chapter, a memorandum, or a Director’s Order, indicate what it supersedes and the date of the old document.

 

 

Use a table of contents.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Topics

Sections

Overview

1.1 What is the purpose of this chapter?

1.2 What is the scope of this chapter?

1.3 What is the overall policy?

1.4 What are the authorities for this chapter?

1.5 What terms do you need to know to understand this chapter?

Responsibilities

1.6 Who is responsible for the requirements in this policy?

Formatting Requirements and Tips

1.7 How do you format the sections in a chapter?

1.8 What are some good ways of showing requirements without long paragraphs of narrative?

Plain Language

1.9 Where can employees find more information about plain language?

 

OVERVIEW

 

1.1 What is the purpose of this chapter? This question is required. Explain why you are writing the chapter. The first numeral is the chapter number, and the second numeral is the section number, e.g., 1.1 is Chapter 1, Section 1. Type the text in 11 point Arial font and use single spacing between the lines in the paragraph/section. Double-space between sections.

 

1.2 What is the scope of this chapter?

 

A. This question is required. Most policies apply to all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) employees.

 

B. Some policies only apply to a particular segment of employees or an aspect of a topic.

 

(1) Applicable to a segment of employees: For example, if the policy only applies to law enforcement officers in the National Wildlife Refuge System, explain that under the scope question.

 

(2) Applicable to a certain aspect of a topic: For example, if you need to write a safety chapter that has requirements just for watercraft that are 17 feet or smaller, explain that under the scope question.

 

1.3 What is the overall policy? OR What are the objectives of this chapter? Include this section if you think it will clarify the Service’s overall policy. Write a short overview of the policy or the objectives of the policy. If you have a list of objectives, it will make it easier to read if you list them vertically. Write your:

 

A. First objective here,

 

B. Second objective here, and

 

C. Third objective here, etc.

 

1.4 What are the authorities for this chapter? Do not list all laws, regulations, and policies related to the subject—only list those that authorize us to make the requirements (it may be one authority). Do not interpret the authorities—just list them with citations in parentheses:

 

A. Archeological and Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 469–469c).

 

B. National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321–4347).

 

C. Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA (40 CFR 1500–1508).

 

1.5 What terms do you need to know to understand this chapter? If your overall policy section (see section 1.3) includes several technical terms, you may need to move this section up before it. This section is only necessary if you must define technical terms that people wouldn’t understand otherwise, or you use common terms in an unusual way. Do not define terms that you don’t use elsewhere in the chapter. Do not establish policy in a definition—the requirements should be in other sections dedicated to them, not the definitions section, which not everyone will read.  

 

A. Term 1 means…

 

B. Term 2 means…

 

If you have two or more pages of terms to define, consider using a glossary table like Table 1-1 below. You can also include this glossary as an exhibit and cross-reference it after posing the section’s question, which will make your chapter considerably shorter.

 

Table 1-1: Sample Glossary Table

Click on a letter below to find a term.

 

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H   I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R   S   T    U   V    W   X    Y    Z

A

Axxx term. Write a definition here.

 

Axxx2 term. Write a definition here. This would be the second word you want to define that begins with the letter “A.” Put them in alphabetical order.

B

Bxxx term. Write a definition here.

C

Cxxxx term. Write a definition here.

D

Dxxxx term. Write a definition here.

 

 

E

 

Exxx term. Write a definition here.

 

Exxx2 term. Write a definition here.

 

F

Fxxx term Write a definition here.

 

G

Gxxx term. Write a definition here.

 

H - K

None.

This is just to illustrate what you would do if you have a letter of the alphabet with no terms to define.

L

Lxxx term. Write a definition here.

 

M

Mxxx term. Write a definition here.

N

Nxxx term. Write a definition here.

 

O

Oxxx term. Write a definition here.

P

Pxxxx term. Write a definition here.

 

 

Q

None.

This is just to illustrate what you would do if you have a letter of the alphabet with no terms to define.

R

Rxxx term. Write a definition here.

 

 

S

Sxxx term. Write a definition here.

T

Txxx term. Write a definition here.

 

U-V

None.

This is just to illustrate what you would do if you have a letter of the alphabet with no terms to define.

W

Wxxx term. Write a definition here.

X-Z

None.

This is just to illustrate what you would do if you have a letter of the alphabet with no terms to define.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

1.6 Who is responsible for (insert policy name)? If different offices, divisions, or positions have different responsibilities under the policy, this is where you describe them. Use a table like Table 1-2.

 

Table 1-2: Sample Table of Showing Responsibilities for Developing Service Manual Chapters

These employees…

Are responsible for…

A. The Director

Approving or declining to approve Servicewide policy.

B. The Assistant Director – Budget, Planning and Human Capital

Overseeing Service directives.

 

C. Regional Directors

Reviewing draft chapters and providing program offices with comments.

D. The Chief, Division of Policy, Performance, and Management Programs (PPM)

(1) Ensuring that Service Manual chapters are easy to read,

 

(2) Working with program offices to develop and manage chapters, and

 

(3) Publishing Service Manual chapters online after the Director approves them.

E. The Chief, Division of the Program Writing the Chapter

(1) Working with PPM to develop the chapter,

 

(2) Sending the draft chapter through the Director to the Directorate for review and comment (see 011 FW 3),

 

(3) Incorporating comments from the Directorate and preparing a final chapter for surname, and

 

(4) Keeping the chapter up-to-date.

 

FORMATTING REQUIREMENTS AND TIPS

 

1.7 How do you format the sections in a chapter? This is where you begin to write the requirements. Ask yourself what questions people will ask who need to understand it. Put these questions in a logical order. The following letters and numbers show how we break down subsections below the initial section of a chapter:

 

A.

REMEMBER: You can’t have an “A” without a “B,” a “(1)” without a “(2),” an (a) without a (b), etc…

 

 


(1)

 

(2)

 

       (a)

 

       (b)

 

                     (i)

 

                     (ii)

 

                     (iii)

 

B.

 

(1)

 

(2)

 

1.8 What are some good ways of showing requirements without long paragraphs of narrative?

 

A. Tables. Tables are a great way to describe “if – then” scenarios or to present information where the reader needs to easily compare information. Also see 011 FW 2, Exhibit 2 for samples of tables you can download.

 

(1) We reference tables like this: See Table 1-3.

 

Table 1-3: Sample Table Used for an “If-Then” Scenario

If you are processing this type of permit application…

Then send the draft via email here within 30 days of receiving the application…

(1) Authorized intentional takings of the last piece of cake by a private party

Chief, Division of Cake Permitting, in Headquarters

(2) Authorized intentional takings of the last piece of cake by a corporation

Assistant Director – Bakery Permitting Program in Headquarters

(3) Incidental takings of cupcakes by any entity during otherwise authorized activities

Assistant Regional Director – Baked and Fried Foods

 

(2) Here’s an example of a “Do’s and Don’ts” table. This type of table may be helpful for some policies, but be sure you are not just repeating elements that are already in the responsibilities table that appears earlier in the chapter. See Table 1-4.

 

Table 1-4: Do’s and Don’ts When Writing Service Manual Chapters

Do…

Don’t…

(1) Talk to the Directives Officer in PPM to share information about your plan for writing and to gather information about the process.

(1) Don’t start writing in a vacuum. Talk to colleagues and the experts in PPM to gather as much information as possible about what employees need to know about your topic.

(2) Outline your ideas in a logical manner before you begin writing. This will help you develop your table of contents.

(2) Don’t start using the template without organizing the information you want to present first. Sort it out before you begin.

(3) Read about plain language in 116 FW 1 and do your best to use language that anyone could understand.

(3) Don’t worry too much when you begin writing the first draft about how it sounds. Get the information down on paper. You can revisit and revise your chapter, and PPM will help you polish the language.

 

B. Figures. You can use figures to describe complex ideas or illustrate your point. When using a figure, center the title above the figure and number it in the same way you number tables (see Figure 1-1).

 

Figure 1-1: Example Figure (Cake Safety)

 

 

PLAIN LANGUAGE

 

1.9 Where can employees find more information about plain language?

 

A. There are several available sources for information about plain language, many of which provide additional resources where you can read more about the practice. Following are a few:

 

(1) 116 FW 1, Plain Language in Fish and Wildlife Service Documents;

 

(2) Federal Plain Language Web site; and

 

(3) The Service’s Plain Language Web site.

 

B. The Directives Officer in PPM is also available to help you. Part of the review and clearance process (011 FW 3) involves the Directives Officer editing your policy. He/she edits for plain language, which includes grammar, style, and clarity.

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit, contact Krista Bibb in the Division of Policy, Performance, and Management Programs.

 

 

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