Title: fish and wildlife service logo - Description: fish and wildlife service logo

343 FW 5
Mapping

Supersedes 343 FW 3, 5/19/2006

Date:  August 13, 2018

Series: Real Property

Part 343: Cadastral Surveys and Maps

Originating Office: Division of Realty

PDF Version

                                                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS

Topics

Sections

Overview

5.1 What is the purpose of this chapter?

5.2 What is the scope of this chapter?

5.3 What are the authorities and terms you need to know to understand this chapter?

5.4 What is the overall policy?

Responsibilities

5.5 Who is responsible for the Service’s cadastral geospatial data and maps program?

Requirements and Formats

5.6 What thematic maps does the Service require, and what are their specifications?

 

OVERVIEW

 

5.1 What is the purpose of this chapter? This chapter:

 

A. Defines the standards and basic procedures for the two primary functions that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Realty Cartographers must carry out:

 

(1) Mapping and cartographic production; and

 

(2) The design, management, and publication of the cadastral geodatabase for the Service; and

 

B. Requires that employees involved in the Division of Realty’s cartography program follow the guidance in The Mapping and Cadastral Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Handbook (The Mapping Handbook)

 

5.2 What is the scope of this chapter?

 

A. This chapter applies to the cartographic activities and products of the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS), which is the program that supports realty functions Servicewide.

 

B. When contracting for realty services, Contracting Officers and managers should ensure the requirements in this policy are met.

 

C. We encourage other Service divisions and programs to use the cartographic standards in this policy and its accompanying handbook whenever it is appropriate to do so.

 

5.3 What are the authorities and terms you need to know to understand this chapter? See 343 FW 1 for a list of the authorities and definitions of terms for all the chapters in Part 343.

 

5.4 What is the overall policy? 

 

A. Because the Service requires maps for refuge planning, acquisitions, land status updates, surveys (see 343 FW 1, Survey Policies, Authority, and Responsibilities), realty management, and other special purposes, we maintain a staff to provide professional quality products for these purposes.

 

B. All new maps we produce or revise must adhere to the formats and standards in The Mapping Handbook.

 

C. Division of Realty staff must create, maintain, and publish GIS data layers representing Service lands and other associated boundaries using current geospatial technologies following the guidance provided in the handbook.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

5.5 Who is responsible for the Service’s cadastral geospatial data and maps program? Although 343 FW 1 includes a listing of general responsibilities for the cadastral survey program, the responsibilities in Table 5-1 below are specific to the mapping and cadastral GIS program.

 

                                                                        Table 5-1: Responsibilities Specific to Mapping and Cadastral GIS

These employees…

Are responsible for…

A. The Chief Cartographer (in the NWRS Division of Realty)

(1) Serving as the principal data steward for publication of the national cadastral geodatabase,

 

(2) Ensuring the overall quality and timeliness of national map products,

 

(3) Chairing the Service’s Cadastral Data Working Group (CDWG), and

 

(4) Serving as a deputy member representing the Department of the Interior on the U.S. Board of Geographic Names.

B. Regional Realty Cartographers

(1) Managing the inventory of real estate parcel boundaries that the Service acquires and administers;

 

(2) Managing the inventory of legislative, specially designated, and approved boundaries under the Service’s jurisdiction;

 

(3) Managing the location of permits and rights-of-way boundaries that the Service grants;

 

(4) Incorporating cadastral survey and boundary data into the cadastral geodatabase;

 

(5) Maintaining an up-to-date set of land status maps depicting land tenure and encumbrances at every unit defined in the Annual Report of Lands; 

 

(6) Ensuring the quality and timeliness of Regional map products; and

 

(7) Serving as members of the CDWG.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND FORMATS

 

5.6 What thematic maps does the Service require, and what are their specifications?

 

A. We require the following thematic maps:

 

(1) Approved acquisition boundary map. A map depicting the boundary line(s) enclosing those lands that we have authority to acquire in whole or in part. This boundary often encompasses both public and private land, but does not imply that we are targeting all private parcels within the boundary for acquisition. The approved acquisition boundary can originate from a variety of means (e.g., Executive Order, congressional legislation, Secretarial Order, Public Land Order, Service Director, Regional Director, Migratory Bird Conservation Commission).

 

(2) Categorical Exclusion (CE) map. A map in a CE (“cat ex”) document that identifies the addition of a specific tract(s) proposed for acquisition.

 

(3) Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) maps. Maps in a CCP document that depict the habitats, resources, and proposed management plans for an approved project. Not all maps in a CCP must display the format specifications described in The Mapping Handbook. Maps that are part of a CCP document don’t need to have all required map elements if the document already includes those elements (e.g., FWS title bar, seals, map title included in the figure name, etc.). Standalone maps (versions outside of documents) must have all required elements.

 

(4) Environmental Assessment (EA) maps. Various sized maps in an EA document that depict the habitats, cultural resources, hazards, and possible management alternatives of a proposed project. Not all maps in an EA must display the format specifications described in The Mapping Handbook. Maps that are part of an EA document don’t need to have all required map elements if the document already includes those elements (e.g., FWS title bar, seals, map title included in the figure name, etc.). Standalone maps (versions outside of documents) must have all required elements.

 

(5) Exchange map. A map that depicts lands we are proposing for exchange with another governmental agency, between the Service and a non-governmental organization, or between the Service and a private individual.

 

(6) Federal Register/Code of Federal Regulations map. A map used to depict official actions we have taken. The map is published in the Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, or similar official Government publication.

 

(7) Inholdings/Emergencies and Hardships Funding Request map. A map depicting lands we will acquire within an approved acquisition boundary using funding from the Inholdings/Emergencies or Hardships accounts.

 

(8) Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Briefing Book maps. We portray LWCF projects on maps and describe them in detail in a briefing statement. The maps must accurately reflect the content of the briefing statement, so it is important that the cartographer coordinate with the appropriate Realty Specialist. The maps must also reflect a boundary within which we may acquire lands using the LWCF.

 

(9) Land Protection Plan (LPP) maps. There are various sized maps in an LPP document. We use these maps to inform the public about the lands proposed for acquisition.

 

            (a) LPP maps include:

 

                        (i) A contextual map indicating where the project lies in the larger landscape,

 

                        (ii) A detailed map indicating the proposed acquisition boundary and key conservation features, and

 

                        (iii) One or more maps that prioritize land acquisition.

 

(b) We identify the subject lands with tract boundaries and numbers. Not all maps in an LPP must display the format specifications described in The Mapping Handbook. Maps that are part of an LPP document don’t need to have all required map elements if the document already includes those elements (e.g., FWS title bar, seals, map title included in the figure name, etc.). Standalone maps (versions outside of documents) must have all required elements.

 

(10) Land Protection Strategy (LPS) map. A map in an LPS document depicting the study area with vicinity maps identifying the location of the proposal in the context of the larger landscape, including the project’s contribution to the conservation estate. Not all maps in an LPS document must display the format specifications described in The Mapping Handbook. Maps that are part of an LPS document don’t need to have all required map elements if the document already includes those elements (e.g., FWS title bar, seals, map title included in the figure name, etc.). Standalone maps (versions outside of documents) must have all required elements."

 

(11) Location map. A small-scale map, usually shown in the form of an inset depicting the location of the subject area within a larger geographic area.

 

(12) Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (MBCC) maps. A map used to graphically depict projects submitted for approval at MBCC meetings in Washington, D.C. Acquisitions can only occur within the MBCC-approved boundary or the boundary that they will approve. The scale of the maps must be adequate to depict all necessary detail.

 

(13) Ownership map. A map depicting inholdings (parcels within the approved acquisition boundary for which we have yet to acquire an interest) that may be identified by tract boundary and tract number in addition to the information found on a status map. Ownership maps contain information that may be confidential and not suitable for disclosure to the public.

 

(14) Specially Legislated Area map. A map depicting a conservation area or unit of the NWRS created by special legislation or is included for or within a specially legislated area.

 

(15) Status map. A map depicting lands in which we have acquired an interest (fee interest, less than fee interest). We identify individual parcels of land by tract boundary and tract number. In addition, status maps must depict the approved acquisition boundary, wilderness boundary, and encumbrances and outgrants, as appropriate. The maps are sometimes referred to as Land Status Maps. Status maps are generally suitable for disclosure to the public.

 

(16) Transfer map. A map depicting lands that we are proposing for transfer or that another governmental agency is proposing to transfer to us.

 

(17) Vicinity map. A small-scale map, usually shown in the form of an inset, depicting the subject area with reference to state, county, city, and other prominent features, as appropriate.

 

(18) Water Rights map. A map depicting existing water rights or water rights application information.

 

(19) Wild and Scenic River map. A map of a river or river corridor within a unit of the NWRS that is part of the National Wild and Scenic River System.

 

(20) Wilderness map. A map depicting an area within a unit of the NWRS that is part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Wilderness maps must reflect the approved acquisition boundary and the wilderness area at the time of the designation. The Wilderness Act requires that we file the map and a legal description with the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and the House Committee on Natural Resources. See 610 FW 1 – 5 for more information about wilderness designations.

 

(21) Other maps. Maps required for special projects and purposes that we have not described in this section. The size, scale, format, and content of the map will vary based on the individual map requirements. However, we should use the specifications of the various map elements described in The Mapping Handbook, as appropriate.

 

B. The types of maps we describe in section 5.6A must meet the formatting specifications and submission guidance in The Mapping Handbook, except as otherwise noted.

 

For more information about this policy, contact the Division of Realty in the National Wildlife Refuge System program. For more information about this website, contact Krista Bibb in the Division of Policy, Performance, and Management Programs.

 

 

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