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Geographic Team: Hawaii Island, Maui Nui

Palila.jpg

SPECIES HIGHLIGHT: PALILA

Scientific name: Loxioides balleui

Status: Endangered

Critical habitat: Designated on Mauna Kea, Hawaii Island

Listing: The palila was listed as endangered in 1967, critical habitat was designated in 1977, and a recovery plan was completed in 2006.

Range: Palila are currently only found in a small population on the southwestern slopes of Mauna Kea on Hawaii Island.

Population trend: The palila population decreased by 68 percent over a 16-year monitoring period from 1998 to 2014. The 2014 population was estimated at around 2,000 individuals.

Threats: Threats to the palila include habitat loss and degradation, non-native mammalian predators, invasive plant species, fire, drought, and avian disease.


Numerous partners have worked to protect and recover the endangered palila over the past five decades. Please visit their websites to learn about the hard work they are doing to save the palila:

American Bird Conservancy

U.S. Geological Survey

Hawaii DOFAW, Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project

San Diego Zoo, Hawaii Endangered Bird Conservation Program

 

  • Partnerships

    The Maui Nui and Hawaii Island Team works with private landowners through the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program to provide technical and financial assistance to protect and restore habitats for the benefit of threatened and endangered species and native ecosystems.  Below are some examples of current projects.


    Makaalia Fence Project 

  • Recovery of Species

    Mauna Loa silversword (Ken Foote, USFWS)

    The Maui Nui and Hawaiian Island Team works toward the recovery of listed species by providing technical expertise, allocating funds, cooperating with other resource agencies, such as the National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, and forging partnerships with private landowners and other entities.  Below are some examples of current recovery projects we are working on. 


    Restoration of the Alala 

    Mauna Loa Silversword 

  • Consultations and Technical Assistance

    The Maui Nui and Hawaii Island Team provides guidance and support to federal agencies and other entities on potential project impacts to listed species and critical habitat.  Our biologists provide technical assistance to project proponents, planners, and agency personnel in developing plans that conserve, restore or enhance fish and wildlife while at the same time accomplishing the objectives of proposed development. Our biologists review and provide recommendations on plans and development designs, develop avoidance and minimization measures and mitigation plans, and provide expertise in wildlife and habitat science.

    Please contact the Team Leader, Michelle Bogardus, at 808.792.9473, if you have questions regarding the consultation and technical assistance process, or send correspondence to our office at Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office, 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Honolulu, Hawaii 96850.  Below are some examples of current consultations.


    Kona Waterbirds 

    Pohakuloa Training Area 

  • Habitat Conservation Plans and Safe Harbor Agreements

    The Maui Nui and Hawaii Island Team provides guidance and support to non-federal entities on potential project impacts to listed species and critical habitat.  If take of listed species cannot be avoided, our biologists can assist project proponents and planners in developing applying for an Incidental Take Permit.  A complete application includes a Habitat Conservation Plan that avoids and minimizes impacts to listed species and mitigates take that cannot be avoided.

    Please contact the Maui Nui and Hawaii Island Team Leader, Michelle Bogardus, at Michelle_Bogardus@fws.gov, if you have questions regarding the habitat conservation planning process, or send correspondence to our office at Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office, 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Honolulu, Hawaii 96850.  We currently work on a variety of Habitat Conservation Plans, including resort development, land management, and alternative energy.  Below is some additional information on alternative energy Habitat Conservation Plans.


    Alternative Energy 

  • Maui Nui Critical Habitat Designation

    The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service announced on March 30, 2016 the Final Determination of Critical Habitat for 125 protected species on Maui Nui. The final designated critical habitat includes 157,002 acres located within the islands of Molokai, Maui, and Kahoolawe in the State of Hawaii, and includes critical habitat for one tree snail, two forest birds, and 122 plants.


    Federal Register

    News Release

     

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