Story Maps

Exploring the Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge

by: Julia Fregonara

Welcome to Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge! This is the place we’ve been learning about all year, and even though we can’t all be there at the same time, I am so excited to share this special place with you through a virtual tour.

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Racing the Tide

by:Brent Lawrence

The tide was slowly draining out of Nestucca Bay, and it was still hours before the sun would peek above the horizon. The only light was from headlights of the machinery that was already rumbling along in the cool night air, moving dirt at an incredible pace. A crew of heavy equipment operators were racing the tide on the Upton Slough section of Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge on the Oregon Coast.

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Returning Life to the River

by:Brent Lawrence

Salmon and steelhead have one goal when they begin their trek up river from the Pacific Ocean: spawning to create new life. Their hell-bent drive to get upstream also brings life in an unexpected way. Once the fish spawn and die, they become the equivalent of 14-pound bags of fertilizer as their bodies provide nutrients that rejuvenate the plants and animals in the watershed. But on the Middle Fork of the Nooksack River, there’s a big dam problem that keeps salmon and steelhead from spawning in the final 16 miles of river as it reaches Mount Baker: A 24-foot tall diversion dam used by the City of Bellingham for drinking water

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Veterans Discover Tranquility in Nature

by:Brent Lawrence

Even though the weather wasn’t conducive to good waterfowl hunting, it was perfect for talking. For many of the 20 U.S. military veterans and active duty soldiers who were introduced to waterfowl hunting that day in November, a little time to talk was what they wanted - and perhaps, needed - during the second annual Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Veterans’ Waterfowl Hunt. The veterans hunt started through a partnership between the Washington Waterfowl Association’s Lower Columbia Chapter and Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge.

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The River Runs Through It

by:Brent Lawrence

For Urban National Wildlife Refuge Day and National Public Lands Day, we look at two urban refuges connected by the Tualatin River. The two extensive projects on the refuges will provide habitat for fish, wildlife and plants, and help provide quality drinking water for 400,000 humans. The projects are also strengthening long-term relationships with local cities and myriad partners.

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Fishing for All: Bank on It

by:Brent Lawrence

Nestucca Bay NWR opened a new bankside fishing access on the Little Nestucca River.The new fishing access is part of the Service’s commitment to increased access to public lands. This bankside fishing access was part of a recent rule that created new or expanded hunting and fishing opportunities at 77 National Wildlife Refuges and 15 National Fish Hatcheries.

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Northern Leopard Frog Release at Columbia NWR

by:Brent Lawrence

Hundreds of northern leopard frogs have taken a leap into the wild in recent weeks at Columbia National Wildlife Refuge in central Washington. The releases were made possible by a partnership between the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Oregon Zoo, Washington State University (WSU) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Managing with Prescribed Fire

by: Molly Cox / Brent Lawrence

Improved public safety and habitat management are two significant benefits from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Pacific Region Fire Management Program.  This takes a look at general purposes of prescribed burns and specifically looks at a planned burn on Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge.

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How a Fish Hatchery Works

by: Sarah Levy

Since the inception of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1871, fisheries conservation has been an important part of the agency's mission. Fish hatcheries are facilities where Tribes, local, state, and the federal government breed, grow, study, and protect fish. Hatcheries contribute to sustainable fisheries, improve fish health, provide insight into fish and their ecosystems, and provide sustenance to the people and animals that depend on them.

Join us as we tour the Service’s Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, located about 50 miles east of Portland.

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Sagebrush Portraits

by: Sarah Levy

The greater sage-grouse once occupied more than 290 million acres of sagebrush in the West. Because of wildfire, invasive plants, fragmentation, and overgrazing, the sage-grouse has lost more than half its range. Private landowners, states, and federal agencies have been working together to reduce threats to the sage-grouse and other species that depend on the sagebrush ecosystem. In this story map, you can meet the people working to conserve the sagebrush ecosystem.

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Saving Columbian White-Tailed Deer: The True Story of how an Endangered Species Came Back from the Brink

by: Sarah Levy

The white-tailed deer is an American icon. For generations, Americans have hunted, photographed, observed, and celebrated a deer that is both ubiquitous and unique. While white-tailed deer are common across much of eastern United States, the Columbian white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus leucurus) is the only subspecies of white-tail deer found west of the Cascade mountain range. It is both familiar and different, a longtime friend and a rare, distinct animal. In 1967, officials estimated that less than 1,000 deer remained. This is the story of how an interagency, multi-organizational effort brought the deer back from the brink.

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All in a Day’s Work

by: Sarah Levy

We wake up across the international date line on Wake Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, nearly 2,000 miles southeast of Tokyo. The sun rises for us again on the Idaho-Montana border where elk and sage-grouse roam, and finally sets on the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial.

The Pacific Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spans one ocean, four states, and works with others to protect thousands of birds, fish, animals, and the places they live. Join us for a tour!

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An Incredible Journey

by: Sarah Levy Rylan Suehisa, Brent Lawrence

In early May each year, a tranquil little dot on the Washington coastline transforms into a high-traffic north-south shorebird highway known as the Pacific Flyway. From long-distance fliers to birds that prefer a more scenic route, they all stop here because it has all the amenities that a hungry and tired bird could want. So, where is this place? It’s Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge, and it’s nature’s version of Grand Central Station.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service put together a story map to help you--all of you--experience this amazing event for yourselves. Whether you're attending the Grays Harbor Shorebird and Nature Festival for the first time or you're an experienced birder, we've got a story to tell.

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Hunting and Waterfowl Migration: Celebrating the Relationship between Hunting and Conservation

by: Sarah Levy, Rylan Suehisa

Every October and November, hunters gear up to enjoy a pastime that connects them to public lands and conservation. The start of fall marks the beginning of waterfowl hunting season. Join us as we explore the relationship between waterfowl conservation and hunting. We discuss the mechanics of migration--how birds get from there to here and back again--the relationship between hunting and conservation, and where you can go if you want to go waterfowl hunting on National Wildlife Refuges in the Pacific Northwest.

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The “little red fish” with a big tale to tell

by: WFWO

Travel just a few miles from downtown Seattle and you will find the Lake Sammamish watershed. In addition to being home to more than 20 percent of Washington’s human population, the watershed is home to a unique PNW inhabitant: the kokanee salmon.

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Coho Urban Runoff Mortality Syndrome in Puget Sound

by: Ken King

Coho salmon are dying in large numbers when they return to watersheds across Puget Sound. Research has shown that urbanization is contaminating their habitats with stormwater runoff, likely leading to their demise – but you can help fix this problem! Take a digital tour with this storymap to find out where and how toxic chemicals in stormwater affect our salmon and what you can do to help save them.

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A Second Chance for Two Western Snowy Plovers

by: WFWO

When a biologist found two Western snowy plover chicks in need, she acted quickly to make sure they were properly rehabilitated and released back into the wild.

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Connecting Young Fly Fishers with Nature

by: WFWO

Story about the Northwest Youth Conservation and Fly Fishing Academy

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Coral’s Journey

by: WFWO

When an olive ridley sea turtle washed ashore on the Oregon Coast in October 2017, a team of organizations banded together to rescue her, rehabilitate her, and eventually release her back into the wild

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Endangered Species: Oregon Stories of Recovery

by: Jodie Delavan & Elizabeth Materna

In Oregon, we have made significant progress in recovering rare and imperiled species and this storymap guides viewers through our many successes.  The people, the places, and the unique species are all stars in this story.

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Borax Lake Chub Recovery: A Tiny but Tough Fish

by: Meghan Kearney, Elizabeth Materna, Jodie Delavan

This storymap guides you through an exploration of a fascinating lake and its stunning landscape and introduces viewers to the remarkable little fish that has made a recovery comeback.  The Borax Lake chub resides in a spring-fed lake and has evolved to persist where no other fish does!!!  While the fish is the superhero of this story, our conservation partners are the stars that have led the effort to protect Borax Lake and its distinctive chub.

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An Egg-cellent Adventure

by: Meghan Kearney, Brent Lawrence, Amanda Smith

A fish-eye view of the huge journey taken by a tiny salmon egg. From the

spawning floor and the nursery of our hatcheries to the rivers and oceans of the Pacific Northwest, follow the saga of our baby salmon and learn about the phases, perils, and propagation of these vital fish

 

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Pacific Lamprey

by: USFWS

A comprehensive, interactive guide through the historical, cultural, and biological timeline of Pacific lamprey with information on threats faced, conservation efforts, and kinks additional Pacific lamprey resources

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Our Legacy, Our Future

by: Amanda Smith

Take a digital tour through some of the bright moments of 2017 for our Fisheries and Aquatic Conservation program and learn more about how our legacy of strong science and history of community power us into the future of aquaculture.

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Exploring Midway Atoll

by: Holly Richards

Midway Atoll is one of the most remote locations on the planet. Named for its position mid way across the Pacific Ocean, Midway sits perched at the intersection of history, nature, and culture. Now you can explore Midway on this interactive tour that combines historical and cultural perspectives with the modern day landscape of the atoll.

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Midway Seabird Protection Project

by: Holly Richards

Explore a digital story version of the Midway Seabird Protection Project Draft Environmental Assessment. This information is not intended to supplement the official draft EA, not replace it. Visit www.fws.gov/refuge/Midway_Atoll for more.

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