Pacific Region Highlights


Grande Ronde River and Watershed

Grande Ronde River and Watershed FWS / Nez Perce Tribe w/permission

The Nez Perce Tribe - A Valued Partner on Bull Trout Conservation


As part of Native American Heritage Month, we want to highlight our successful partnership with the Nez Perce Tribe and their accomplishments in Bull Trout Recovery. The Tribe’s Department of Fisheries Resources Management has been supporting this conservation effort for many years, making it possible to accomplish bull trout spawning surveys in the Wallowa Mountains within the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Basins. 


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Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries


Pacific Islanders attend NCTC Workshop

Pacific Islanders attend NCTC Workshop FWS Image

Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress


Seeking Native American, Alaskan Native, and Pacific Islander High School students to join students from across the country to discuss community adaptation and related environmental issues impacting Native peoples. The mission of the Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress is to develop future conservation leaders with the skills, knowledge, and tools to address environmental change and conservation challenges to better serve their schools and home communities.
 


Download the application

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Stillaguamish restoration project restores wetlands and protects farmland

Stillaguamish restoration project restores wetlands and protects farmland Northwest Treaty Tribes - w/ permission

Zis A Ba Partnership Benefits Fish, Wildlife and Habitat


In 2012 the Stillaguamish Tribe purchased an 83 acre farm along the Old Mainstem Stillaguamish, across the river from Stanwood. They renamed the property "zis a ba" to honor a Tribal chief who lived in the area many years ago and set about planning to return it to tidal influence. The land had been cut off from the river and tides for over 120 years, depriving Stillaguamish salmon a productive place to rear on their way to the ocean. The Tribe's treaty right to harvest abundant salmon runs depends on restoring thousands of acres of tidal wetlands that have been lost to development and agriculture. Years of planning, design, and meetings with local stakeholders culminated in the first tides flooding "zis a ba" in October of 2017.  In the spring of 2018, juvenile salmon will find this newly restored nursery as they make their way out of the river, gaining size and strength before they face the Pacific Ocean.


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