Pacific Region Highlights


OMSI Family Night

OMSI Family Night OMSI

Family Science Night at OMSI


As an agency with a science based mission, we support efforts to include the Native American community in math and science educational opportunities. Our future workforce depends on it! Click below to learn more about science in the classroom, internships, and careers in the Service.


Careers in Conservation

Salmon in the Classroom

Pathways Program - Opportunities for Youth


A clay facial reconstruction of the Ancient One shows what he may have looked like. Kennewick Man was finally laid to rest February 18, 2017.

A clay facial reconstruction of the Ancient One shows what he may have looked like. Kennewick Man was finally laid to rest February 18, 2017. Courtesy of the Smithsonian

The Ancient One is now at Rest


Nearly 20 years ago, the skeletal remains of a man were discovered along the Columbia River near Kennewick, Washington. The man, who had died nearly 9,000 years earlier, became known as the Kennewick Man or the Ancient One. Columbia Basin Tribes insisted that the Ancient One be repatriated and reburied immediately. However, scientists, looking for clues about the native people of the Americas, insisted that he be studied.
After decades of legal wrangling, religious leaders from the Confederated Colville Tribes, Nez Perce Tribe, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Yakama Nation laid him to rest this past weekend. More than 200 people attended the ceremony at a secret location along the Columbia River.  
The Service proudly works with Tribes to repatriate human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony consistent with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (Public Law 101-601; 25 U.S.C. 3001-3013).


See article in Indian Country Today

Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act


Elwha Tribal member monitoring salmon

Elwha Tribal member monitoring salmon NWTT Image

Northwest Treaty Tribes releases Climate Change Report on Natural Resources


The Treaty Tribes in Western Washington recently released a comprehensive report on how climate change is affecting tribal treaty rights and natural resources. This report from the 20-member tribes of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission focuses on the impacts of climate change to their homelands, waters, and ways of life.  This report details how virtually all of the resources and activities that tribal treaties protect—fishing, gathering, and hunting—are impacted by the effects of climate change. 
 


Learn more from the Northwest Treaty Tribes


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